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Full text of "Maids and a Man 1950"

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REESE LIBRARY 

Augusta College 
Augusta, Georgia 



1 







JoEi. Chandlkr Harris, our beloved 
licorRia author, has given m Brer Rabbit, 
dear to tlie heart of cacli succeeding 
generation. If lie sliould by any cliancc 
offer wit and vvi.sdom not otherwise at- 
tril)iited to him. let this he our apologj' : 
What is any man or rabbit likely to say 
in the presence of 1200 and one: 



GIRLS OF TUBM.\X HIGH SCHOOL 
AucL'STA, Georgia 



Sx ^iivs 



M.^KTH,-\ nVE. l.dilor-m-Cltief 
SONDRA WILLIAMS. Ihisin.ss .Manager 



iritratton 



Because she has unselfishly devoted her- 
self in order to teach us to appreciate and 
love the finer things in life and literature, 
and because she is abounding in gentle 
humor, we, the 1950 Staff of Maids And A 
Man, affectionately dedicate this annual to 
Miss Gertrude J. Comey, whose sympathetic 
insight readily allows her to understand, like 
Joel Chandler Harris did, the many "scared 
rabbits" that are discovered in the calami- 
ties of each day. She holds out that shining 
promise to each student, as Uncle Remus 
did to the little boy, that although Brer Fox 
almost caught Brer Rabbit, he never really 
did — and he never really was going to. 



I 




Mxsa (Bntrah^ i. ©nmeg 




Brer Rabbit sez sezee : 

In" the crowded balls outside Room 205, pounding English Lit 
into balky seniors, flitting from one place to another with amazing 
vitality, you'll sec Miss Gertrude Comey. 

Everj'body knows that Miss Comey comes from Massachusetts. 
Her father was a doctor in that slate, and it was there that she 
acquired her early education and Iut dcj^ree from Smith CoUejic. 

Follow iny her tzraduatiou from Smith. Miss Comey cnriclied 
Augusta by taking up her residence licre. In 1015. it was back to 
college for Miss Come\ — Columbia University and graduate work. 
Complete with degrcjs in education and Knglish Literature. Miss 
Comey came to teach at Tubman in i<)i7. 

Now it's lo.so. and there's no graduate or student ot Tubman 
but that knows and loves Miss Comey. Through the years she has 
taught, worked, scolded, and joked — and impressed her memor>- in- 
delibly on the hundreds of girls wlio have been through Tubman. 
The class of '50 savs "Hurrah for Miss Comey!" 



"/ ain't It'lliu' tw talcs tcr had cliilluvs: 



fLM^fuhu^ila iwM 



"Hit look sorter tu'ous, boss, hut olc an' stcddy." 




LAMAR WOODWARD. I'ruuifal 

A.B.. Mercer University, Macon, Ga. 

M.S., Education, University of Georgia 





w \L! liis.xKv riioiiinio.vs 




A. DOROTHN MAINS, Assistant I'rmdfal 
A.B.. Klizalctli College, Cliarloltc, .V. C. 



MAkV BALK. Sccrc'.ary 
LOUISE \V. SMITH, Assistant Secretary 




First row : 

BERTHA CARSWELL 

B.A., Sliortcr Collejie, Rome, Georgia 

RUTH McAULIFFE 

B,A., A^nes Scott Collej^e, Decatur, Georjjia 

M.A., University of North Carolina, Cliapel Hill 

Naval Reserve Midshipman School, Northampton, Massachusetts 

GRACE .STRAUSS 
A.B.. University of Georgia, Athens 
M.A., Columbia University, New York City 

MARIE HULBERT 

B..S., University of Georgia, Athens 

M.A., Duke Universilj, Durham, North Carolina 

Naval Reserve Midshipman School. Northampton, Massachusetts 

AMABEL l.ANSDELL 

B.A.. Bessie Tift Colli ge, Fors\th, Georgia 



GERTRUDE COMEY 

B.L., Smith College, Northampton, Massachusetts 
M.A., Columbia University, New York City 

ANN BRADDY 

B.A., Converse College, Spartanburg, South Carolina 
M.A., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 
Graduate Work, University of London 

ELEANOR BOATWRIGHT 
B.A., Teachers' College, Columbia University, New Y'ork City- 
M.A., Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 

LOfiA PEARCE 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, Illinois 

M.Ed., Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 

EDITH NACHMAN 

Ph.B., University of Chicago, Illinois 

DOROTHY HALBERT 

B.Mus., College of Fine Arts, Syracuse University, Syracuse, 
New Y'ork 



MARY GILLILAND 

B.A., Converse College, Spartanburg, South Carolina 
M.A., Columbia University, New York City 

BELLE WALKER 

B.A., Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia 

MABEL BYRD 
B.A., Greenville Women's College, Greenville, South Carolina 
Ph.B., Denison University, Granville, Ohio 

SARA FULLBRIGHT 
B..^., Agnes Scott College, Decatur, Georgia 
M.A., Emoo' University, Georgia 



MARGARET WHITE 
B.S., Home Ec, G. S. C. W., 

BEULAH MAE FENDER 
A.B., University of Georgia 



Milledgeville, Georgia 




"Blinc hoss don't fall i\.''cn he fotlcrs dc bit.' 



Second roze : 

FLORA C. THOMPSON 

B.S.. G. S. C. W., Milledgeville, Georgia 

M.A., Columbia University, New York City 

MILDRED VON KAMP 

B.A.. Bowling Green College of Commerce, Bowling Green, 
Kentucky 

SARAH NORRIS 

A.B.J., L^niversity of Georgia, Athens 

MARY JONES 
B.A., Furman University, Green\ illc. South Carolina 

EUGENIA THOMPSON 
B.S., G. S. C. W., Milledgeville, Georgia 




^^£ 




/■ir.>-/ r..:, : 

VALLUSIA AN'CHORS 

A.B.. Mercor L'nivcrsiiy, Macon, Georgia 
SUZANNE WADE BYRD 

A.B.. University ol Georgia, Alliens 
RUTH ROBINSON 

B.A.. Bessie Tilt College, Forsytli. Georgia 
ETHEL SIGMAN 

B.S., Georgia Teachers College, Collcgcboro 

Second role : 
WALDEEN ROBERTS 

B.A.. Mcrci r Inivcrsity. Macon, Georgia 
MARTHA IHllXirS BURNS 

B.S.. G. S. C. \V., Millcdgcvillc, Georgia 

UORRIS HART 

B.S.. in Higli Scliool E<Uication. G. S. C. \\ ., Millednevillc. Georgia 
TH ELM A. I OH N SON 

A.B.. G. S. r. W ., Milledecvilli-. Geon;i:i 



TAQUELIN MARSHAI L 
B.A.. Shorter College. Rome, Georgia 
M.A.. Baylor University, Waco. Texas 

MARY MEYER 
B.S., College of St. Flizaheth. Convent Station. New Jersey 

DOROTHY MOORE 
B.S.. G. S. C. W., MillcdReville. Georgia 



DERKY GARRETT 
Diploma. Martin'.s Business College. Augusta. Georgia 

RUBY MORTON 
B.A., G. S. C. W., Milledgeville, Georgia 

ROBBIE PARKS 

B. A., Winthrop College. Rock Hill. South Carolina 



KUBY TURNER 

B..\., L'niversity of Florida. Gainesville 

KMMA WILKINSON 
B.A.. Ogletlionie University. Georgia 

WINNIE OVERSTREET 
B.S., G. S. C. W., Milledgeville, Georgia 



LAURA AKERMAN 

B.S.. Coker College, llarlsville. South Carolina 

BARBARA CLARK 

B.S,. Peahody College. Nashville. Tennessee 

.MARY MURPHY 
B..^.. Newherry College. Newl.erry. South Carolina 



^^Jaciiitu 



.\i>( I'ulun-d: 

RUTH L. HENDERSON— .^J.^i.^/nllr Librarian 
A.B.. Carson-Newman. Jefferson City. Tennei^ee 

IsLANCHE H. niXON— /.lAriirmii 
A.B.. C,. S. C. W.. Milledgeville. Georgia 
B.S. in L.S.. Peahodv College. .Nashville, Tennessee 





"7 kuUli a iiaii'jul cr hard sense, brer Rabbit, scsce." 



^enuM' 



"I can't skaccly call to mine 'cackly «■'«/ dcy did do, but dey s/'oke spccclics 
en hollered, en cusst, en flung dar langrudge 'roun." 




COPYRIGHT 
WALT DISNEY PRODLCTIONS 



OFFICERS 

President JEWELL BEXTLEY 

Vice-r resident CAROLYN H AI )UEX 

Secretary MARTILMJYE 

Treasurer JANE HENG 

Point-Manager. BENGOVAX GEORGE 



SENIOR SPONSOR 




MISS GRACE STKALSS 




Martha Dye, Jane Heng. Jewell Bentley, Carolyn Hadden, Bengovan George 



^€/m^ ^ouneii 




Scaled: Bun>;ovan f_ieor};c, Martha Dye, Jt-wt-ll BciUk-y. Jaiif Hl'Iij^, ('anil\ii lladdLii. 

Knrcliiu/ : Barbara Glass, Roslyn Bogeslov, Sara (iailoway. Austin i iilHlaiul, liarliara 
Ik'uiictt. Mary Kiitli Bridges. Kay Ncolands. l.ois iXizier. 

Slainlini;: Anne I'arrisli, Xancy Willin^liani, Hillic Jean Rntli, Mary laickcy. \ irv:inia 
Towill. Sondra Williams. Jane Ilugnley. Ann Livingston, iiarrictlc iV-rkins. Joe 
Ann Hcndrix, Bctly Clark. 




^enm^6 



BARBARA ALLEN— Central Council 4, 
Class Council 2, Frcncli Club 4, President 
4, Choral Club 3. 4. Honor Society 3. 4, 
\'olleyball i. 2, Rinp Tennis i, Tubman 
Times 4, Feature Pape Editor 4. T 2, H 3. 
Silver H, THS. Silver T. 

SHIRLEY ALLGOOD— Alpha Tri Hi Y 3, 
4, French Club 4. Treasurer 4. Choral Club 
3, 4. Jr. Red Cross i. Tubman Sextet 4, 
Mixed Chorus 2, Band (A. R. C.) 3. 



'.ETTY JEAX BAKER- 
Club I. 



-Home Economics 



\ IVIAX BALKCUM. 

CHRISTINE BARRS— Student I'atr 
4. Home Economics Club i. 



il 2. 



JOYCE BARTON-RiuB Tennis I. Volley 
Ball 2, Tubman Times 2, Red Cross 2, 
Sports Letter 3. Black and (lold T 2. 




H-^ 




GLORIA BKDDINGKIELIJ 
Chill I. 



Home Ec. 




BARBARA BENNETT— Class Council 2. 
4. Hnme Economics Club 1, Rainbow Club 

3. 4. Black and Gold T 2, Tubman Times 

4. T. H. S. 2. 

JEWELL BENTLEY— Student Council I. 

2. 3. 4. Central Coinicil 1, 2, 3, 4, Sec. of 
Class I, 2, Pres. of Class 3, 4. Choral Club 

3, 4. Secretary 4. Alpha Tri Hi Y 3, 4. 
French Club 4, Tubman Times I. 4, Band 
(A. R. C.) 2, 3. Mixed Chorus 2, Tubman 
-Sextet 4. 



MARION BLACKSTONE. 

MARY ALICE BLAIR— Student I'atrol ,f. 
D. O. E. Club 4, Home Ec. Club 1 . 





S^mtio^^ 



BETTY BLANCHARD— D. O. E. Club 4, 
Annual Staff 3, 4. 



NELLE BLANCHARD— Red Cross 2, 4, 
F. T. A. 3, 4, Librarian ( F. T. A.) 4, Vice 
Pres. of Home Room 3. 



PATSY BLAXCHARD— Choral Club 2. 3. 
4, Pres. 4, Red Cros; 3, Vice Pres. 3. Cen 
tral Council 4. D.O.E. Club 4. Vice Pres. .;, 
Student Council 4. Homeroom Treas. 4 
Volley Ball 2. 

ROSLVN' BOGESLOV— Jr. Red Cross i. 
Ring Tennis i, Volley Ball i. Class Coun 
cil I, 2, 3, J. Treasurer 3, Citizenship Com 
mitttee 2. Student Patrol 3. 4. Honor So- 
ciety 3, i'. French Club 4, Vice Pres. 4. 
Tubman Times 4, Editor-in-chief .\. Pub- 
licity Comm. 4, Gold T i. 2, Silver H 3. 

CAROLYN BOHLER— Choral Club 2. 3. \, 
Choir I, 2, 3, 4. 



CYNTHIA BOLTON— Honor Society 3. -4. 
Spanish Club 4, President 4, Tubmai 
Times 4. Page Editor 4, Student Patrol 3. 
Central Council 4, Alpha Tri Hi V. 

JEAN BOWICK 

ADA RR.VDl.KV — Lil.r;.r\ Assistant 4. 
Home F.c. ( "hib I. 



LAVERNE BRIDGES 

MARY RUTH BKI DGE.S— F. T. A. .). j, 
Class ('ouiuii I, 3. !. Gold T 1. Spanish 
Club 3. .|. Animal SlalT .•. 3, 4, Citizeuship 
T J. Ciliziiiship 11 i. \,,lley Ball Team |. 

MARTHA BRYAN — Home Economics 
Club 1, Snack Bar 4, I.ibniry Assistant 3. 





G^mtkM 



BETTY BUMPUS — Home Economics 
Cliib I. Student Patrol J, Library As- 
sistant 4. 

MOLLIE BL'RDELL— Sttulcnt Patrol 3, 4, 
Tubman Times 1, 3. Annual Staff 4. Tlieta 
Tri Hi ^' J. 4, Sec. and Treas. Home 
Room 3, \^icc Prcs. Home Room 4. Black 
and Gold T 2, Silver T 3. Lost and Found 
Committee 3. 




ELIZABETH Bl Ri.ESS 

CAROLYN BUTLER— Alpha Tri Hi Y 3. 
4. Spanish Chib 3, 4. 



CAROLE CADDEX— Choral Club 4. 

PATRICIA CAMPBELL— Y Teens 1. J. 
Home Ec. Club i. 

AXNE CARMICHAEL— Jr. Red Cross i. 
THS I. T 2, Two stars 3. \arsity Basket- 
ball 3. 4, Athletic Council 2, 3, 4. Vice- 
President 3, Home Room President 2, 3. 
Student Patrol 3, 4. Captain 4. Theta Tri 
Hi Y' 3, 4. Vice President 4. Silver T 2, 
Silver H 3, Gold T 3. .Vnne Creamer Cup 
3. Annual Staff. Picture Editor 4. Fire 
W arden 3. \olley Ball I. 2. 3, Rinp Tennij 

1, 2. 3, 4. Softball I, 2, 3. 4. Basketball i. 

2. 3, 4, Tennis Tournament Winner 2. 3 
Class Council 2, 3, Central Council 4. 



JACKIE CH.WOUS— Library A.^sistant 4- 

BETTY CLARK — Class Council 3. 4. 
Home Room Secretan.- 3, Home Room 
President 4, Ring Tennis 3. 4, Volley 
ball I. ^, 3. 4. Basketball I, 2, 3. 4. \'ar- 
sity Basketball 3, 4, Fire V\arden 4. 
Tubman Times 2. 4, Sports Editor 4. THS 
I, T 2, Athletic Council 4, Athletic Star 
3. 4. Soft Ball I. 2, 3. 4. Lost and Found 
Committee 2. Red Cross Representative I. 
Volleyball Captain 3. Black and Gold T 2, 
Black and Gold H 3, Silver Basketball 3. 



Felt Basketball 3. 

JOYCE CLAYTOX 
Club 1. 



Home Economics 




^enuM 



MARY ANN COX— Home Economics Club 

1, Rainbow Girls 3, 4, Projector Operator 
4- 

JEANETTE CRAWFORD— Home Econo- 
mic Club I, Red Cross 2, 3, Student Patrol 

2, Rainbow Girls 3, 4, Class Council 4. 

JEAN CREECH— Class Council 3, Ring 
Tennis Tournament 2, 3. 



MARTHA CRENSHAW. 

BARBARA CULPEPPER— Lnncbroom 4. 

LA\TRN DAVIS— Student Patrol 2, 3, 
Snack Bar 4. Home Economic Club i, 
Annual Staff 4. Black and Gold T 3. 








LOIS DOZIER— Class Council 2. 4. Chorai 
Club 3, 4, Volleyball team 2. Basketball 
team 2, Ring Tennis 3, Intramural Sports 
I. 2. 3, Student Patrol 2, Vice-President 
of Home Room i. 3, Red Cross Repre- 
sentative 2. 

JANICE DUBOSE— Student Patrol 3, 
Home Economics Club i. 

PEGGY DURHAM— Class Council i. 2, 
Central Council 4, D. E. Club 3. 4, Home 
Economics Club 2. 



MARiiARKT DYE — Class Council 1, 
Snack Bar 4. Library Assistant 4. .\nnual 
Staff 4, Circulation Staff of Tubman 
Times 4. 

MARTHA DYE— Junior Red Iross I. 3. 
Sopliomore Class Point Xfanagcr 2. Class 
Council 2. 3. 4, Central Council 4. Junior 
Class Vice-President 3. Senior Class Sec- 
retarj- 4. Student Patrol 3. Newspaper 
Staff 3. Editcr-in-Cliief of Annual 4. 
Future Teachers of America 3. 4. Honor 
Society 3. 4. Cliairman Elections Com- 
mittee 4, French Club 4. Honor Roll I, 
A 3. 4- 

J KAN ELLIOTT 




^mtiiyi^ 



?;LIZABETH KKICKSOX— Home Econo- 
mics Cliih I, Snack Bar J. 
BARBARA EUBAXKS— Annual 4. 

CAROLYN EUBANKS— Choral Clul. j, 4, 
Spanish Club 4. Student Patrol 2. Rinj: 
Tennis Team i. 



1.11.1. IAN EVANS. 

JANICE EVERETT— Choral Chil, 2. 

BETTY JEAN FELL— Home Economics 
Chill I. Rinj; Tennis i. 2. j. 4, Volleyhall 
I. ->, .i. 4. Softball 1. 2. 3, 4, Captain .i, 
Basketball I. .'. 3. 4, Varsity 3, 4. Eire 
Inspector 4. Tubman Times 4, T. II. 
S. I. T 3, Star 3, 4. Junior Red Cross 
Representative 4, Silver Basketball 3, Tclt 
Basketball 3. 



FLORRIE FEEMING— Class Pros. i. 2: X-Pres. T.C.I,. 3. 
President of T. C. L. 4, Annual Staff 1, 2. Student Patrol 
2, 3, 4, Honor Society 3. 4. Athletic Council 2, 4. RiuK 
Tennis i, 2, 3. 4, Volleyball I. 2, 3, 4, Basketball I, 2, 3, 4. 
Varsity 3. 4. Baseball I, 3, 4. French Club 4. Class Coun- 
cil I, 2. Central Council 1. 2, 3. 4. Theta Tri Hi Y 3. 4. 
Chairman of Lost and Found 2, ProRram Chairman 3. 
Home Room President t. 2. Little Store 3. (iold T 2, 
T. H. S. I. T, First Star. 



JOANNE FORD— Choral Club 2. 3. 4. 
Devotional 3. 



Piano Plaver lor 



HELEN POSTER— Home Economics Club 1. Library As- 
sistant 4. 

MARIAN FOSTER— F. T. A. Club 3, Study Hal! Keeper 
3, 4. Home Economics Club 1. 





G^eni€M 



BARBARA liLASS -Class ( riiiKil 4. Anmi;il SUit'f 4. KIcction Commiltw 
4, Assistant Jr. Red Cross Kciiri'siiilativc .i. Minor part in play J. Pro- 
jector Operator 4. TnUman Seraphook 4, Rini: Tennis J, X'olley Hall J, 
Home Room I'oint Manager 4. 

MAK GO DOWNS— Home Keonomics Clnl) i. 

JEAN GRAHAM— Choral Clnb ,i. 4, Rainho« j, 4, l.inuli Room x 4. 
Yonth Temperance Cotnicil .1, 4, Tnl>man Times 4. Band Majorette i. 2, 
3, 4, Slate Baton Twirling Cliatnpionsliip 4, Urnm Majorette 3. 4. 

JOAN (IRIFKIN -Home Kc. Clnl. i. Rinj; Tennis Team I, Jr. Red Cross -'. 
Honor Societv ?. 4, Slndent I'alrol J. 4. Annual Staflf 4. 8tli Grade Stndv 
Hail 4, Silver 'l' 3. 

NELI.K RUTH fillH.L- Class Coimcil 2, 3, F. T. A. Cluh 4, Spanish Club 
3, 4, Athletic ("ouneil 3, 4, Honor Society 4. Tubman Times 2. 3. 4, Ring 
Tennis Tcatn 2. 3. Volle\' Ball Team l. 2. 3. 4, Basketball Team 2, 3, 
Basketball Varsity 3. Softball Team i, 2. 3, T. H. S. Kmblem 1. T Let- 
ter 2, Star Emblem 3. Citizenship T 2, Citizenship H 3. Basketball Emblem 
3. Y Teens i, Citizenship Committee 3. Red Cross Rep. 4, Fire Warden 3. 

BARBARA (iL'N'TER. 



JOAX FULMER — Home Economics Club i. Rainbow Girls 2, 3, 4, Junior 
Red Cross Representative 4. 

SARA GALLOWAY — Home Economics Club i, National Honor Society 4, 
Student Council 4. Reporter for Tubman Times Staff 4, Annual Staff 4, 
Alpha Tri Hi Y' 4. 

BETTY' GARNER— Home Economics Club i, Student Patrol 2, Snack 
Bar 4. 

JEANNETTE GAY— Honor Roll 2, 4. 

BEXGOVAN GEORGE — Home Economics Club i, Class Council 3, 4, 
Athletic Council 2. 3, 4, Secretary 3, F. T. A. Club 3, 4, Treasurer 3, 
President 4, Point Manager of Sr. Class 4, Tubman Times 3, 4, Student 
Patrol 3, 4, Alpha Tri Hi \ 4, Health and Sanitation Committee, i, 4, 
Chairman 4, T. H. S. i. T 2, 1st and 2nd Star Emblem 3, A'arsity Basket- 
ball 2, 3, Silver T 3, Gold T 3, Central Council 4. 

ALTSTIX GILLILAXD — Home Economics Club i. Class Council i, 2, 3, 4. 
Tubman Times i. Health and Sanitation Committee 2, Student Patrol 3, 
Theta Tri Hi Y 3, 4, Varsity Cheer Leader 3. Citizenship Gold T i. Citi- 
zenship Silver T 2, Citizenship Silver H 3. 





. ^enwU 



CAROLYX HADDEN — Home Ec. Club 
!. Treasurer Homeroom i, Fr. Class 
Council I. Sec. Homeroom 2. Sr. Class 
Council 4, Red Cross Rep, i. Rest-room 
Committee 2, Vice Pres. Sr. Class 4. 
\'ice Pres. H. R. Class 4, Sr. Class 
Council 4, Theta Tri Hi Y 3. 4, Cliaplain 
Tri Hi V 4, Election Comm. 4, THS i, 
Movie Operator 4. Lab. 4. 

HELEN HARUE.V — Red Cross Alter. 2, 
Library .Assistant 4. 

A.VX HARPER — Red Cross 3. 




AX.VETTE HARPER — Home Ec. Club 
I. Lost and Found Committee 2. Movie 
Opcnitor 4. 

liRACE HARRIS— Class Council 3. Snack 
Bar 3, Vice Pres. Alpba Tri Hi Y 4, 
S«c. French Club 4, Pres. Y Teen Club 
I. Silver T 3. Red Cross Rep. 4, Home 
Ec. Club 1. 



I'ALLIXK II \kKIS 



Libnirv 3. 



LILLIAN HARTER — Student Patrol 3, 
French Club 4, Librarj- Assistant 4. 

BETTY HELMLV — Student Patrol 2. 4, 
Spanish Club .(, Snack Bar 4. Study Hall 
J. 

GLENDA HENUERSOX — Home Ixo- 
nomics Club 2, Student Patrol 4, Tubman 
Times 2. 4. Spanish Club 4, RiiiR Tennis 
I, 2. Basketball 2. Softball I, 2. 3. Sports 
Letters THS 2. Y Teen I, 2. Radio Club 
4. Black & Gold T 2. 



JOE AXX H EX DRIX— Student Patrol 2, 
I'oint ManaKcr 3, President of Home- 
room 4, Annual Staff 4. Home Economics 
Club I, Silver T 3, Black &• CoM T 2. 

JAXE HEXf; — Honor Roll 1, 2. 3, 4, 
Honor Society 3, 4. President Honor So- 
ciety 4. Class Council 3, 4, Treasurer Class 
Council 4. Central Council 4. French Club 
.(. Theta Tri Hi Y 4. Annual Staff 4, Lit- 
erary Editor 4. Sports Letter THS 3. 
Silver T 3, Lost and Found Committee 
2, 3, Election Committee 4. 

XfARY FRANCES HERNDON— Library 
Assistant 4. Snack Bar 2. 3. Black &• Gold 
T 2, Gold T 1. 




^e^meH 



CAROL HIERS 

LUCILLE HOBBS— Home Ec. Club i, D. 
E. Club 4, Cashier in Lunch Room 3. 

BETTY 10 HORXE— Varsity Basketball 

2. 3. 4, Class Council i, 2, F. T. A. Club 

3, 4, Alpha Tri Hi Y 3. 4, Basketball Emb- 
lem 2, T Letter 2, Star Emblem 3, Black 
and Gold T 2, Athletic Council 3, Student 
Patrol 3, 4, Ring Tennis Team i, 2, 3, 
\'olley Ball Team i, 2, 3. Softball Team 
I, 2. 3, Intra. Basketball i, 2, 3. Snack Bar 
3, Red Cross i. 



BETTY JEAN HOWARD- 
Home Ec. Club i. 



-Snack Bar 3, 



JAXE HUGULEY — Home Economics Club 
I, Alpha Tri Hi Y 3. Theta Tri Hi Y' 4, 
Treas. Homeroom 4. Student Patrol 3, 4, 
Health and Sanitation Committee 4, 
Snack Bar 3, Black and Gold T 2, Silver 
T3. 



BETTY JUNE JACKSOX- 
mics Club i. 



-Home Econo- 



RLBY AXX JAXSEX- 
Club I. 



-Home Economics 



MARJORIE JEXXIXGS— Tubman Times 
4. Annual Staff 4. Honor Society 3. 4, 
Office Assistant 4. Home Economics Club 
I. Se^^■ice Committee 4. 

BARBARA JOHXSOX— Student Patrol 2. 
3, Red Cross Representative 2, \'olley Ball 
Team 3. 4. Rint: Tennis Team 4. Black 
and Gold T 2, Gold T 2. 



r.LORlA JOHNSON"— Choral Club 3. 4. 
French Club 4. Ring Tennis I. 2. Home 
Economics Club i. Teen .■Xrc Club 2, 
Rainbow Girl 4. Silver T 3. Silver H 4. 
Red Cross Representative 3. Volley Ball 

1. 2. Choir 3. 4, F. T. A. 4, Sextet 4- 

GRACE lOHXSON" 

JEAX JOHNSON— THS 2. Ring Tennis i. 

2, \'olle>' Ball I. 2, Service Committee 2. 
Student Patrol 2, Home Ec. Club i. Cir- 
culation Committee 4. 




fjPejiwM 



HARRIET JUE — Sccretar>- of Home 
Room 2, Spanish Club 4. Honor Society 4. 

CAROLYX KEXXEDY — Home Room 
President 2. 3. Hall Patrol 3, Student 
Patrol 4, Red Cross I, Rainbow Member 
2, 3. 4. Rainbow Officer 2, l.ibran- Work 
4, French Club 4. 

rAlI.lXE LKDBETTER 



W ILLIE LEWIS— D. O. E. Club 3, 4. Sec. 
and Treasurer of Home Room 4, Student 
Patrol 2, 4. Home Ec. Club 1. 

AXX LIVINGSTON— President of Home 
Room I. Secrctar\- of Home Room 2. \'icc 
President of Home Room 4, Student Pa- 
trol 2, 3. 4. Athletic Council 2, Spanish 
Club 3. 4, Alpha Tri Hi Y 3. 4. Treasurer 
of Alpha Tri Hi Y 4, Snack Bar 3. Intra- 
mural Sports I. 2, Home Ec. Club I. Sil- 
ver T 3, Gold T 2. Movie Projector Ope- 
rator 4. 

SAIL SIX LOO— Class Council 3. Future 
Teacher's Club 3. .;, Honor Society 4, 
French Club 4. Silver T 3, Home Ec. 
Club I. 



CAROLYX LORD— Home Ec. Club 1. 

BETTY LOTT— Home Ec. Club 2, D. O. F.. 
Club 3, Snack Bar 4. 

BETTY YVOXXE LUCKEY — THS 
(Emblem) 1. Athletic Council I. 2. 3, .|. 
Point Manater of Athletic Council 3. 
Prc.s. of Athletic Council 4, T (Emblem I 
2, Class Council 2, 3. Central Council j. 
Intramural Sports 1. 2, 3. 4. A \'arsil\ 
Basketball 4. 



MARY I.UCKE\ — Class Council 3, 4. 
Athletic Council i. 2. Varsity Basketball 3. 
Intramural Sports 1. 2, THS (Emblem) 1. 
T (Emblem) 2. 

MARY LYNN— F. T. A. 3. Annual StafT .|. 
Snack Bar 4. 

SALLY MADDOX— Home Ec. Club i. 





Gmiio/i^ 



JEANIXE MAYS — Choral Club 2, 3, 4, 
Red Cross 2. Snack Bar 4, Typist tor 
Tubman Times 4. 

SYLVIA MELTOX — Choral Club 2, 3, 4, 
Spanish Club 4. Minor part in play 3. 
Sextet 4- 



PAT MARBUT — Tubman Times 3, 4, 
Managing Editor 4, Choral Club 4^ French 
Club 4, Honor Society 4^ Elections Com- 
mittee 4. 

WAXDA MATTHEWS — Health and 
Sanitation Committee 1. 4, Vice-pres. of 
Home Room 3. Point Manager of Home 
Room 4. Choral Club 3, Home Ec. Club 
2. Future Teachers 4. 



SAXDRA McCONXELL — Treasurer of 
Freshman Class i. Member Student Coun- 
cil 1. 2. Vice-pres. Soph. Class 2. Point 
Manager T. C. L. 3, Member Central 
Council 3, 4, Theta Tri Hi-Y pres. 4, 
Member Tri Hi-Y 3, 4, Member Choral 
Club 1, 3. 4. Reporter Tubman Times 4. 
Chairman Citizenship Committee 3, Mem- 
ber Tri Lamlia Sorority 4, \'ice-pres. 
Home Room J, Member Tubman Sextet 
4. 

XAXCV McEL.MLKRAY — Class Council 
I. Red Cross 2, Ring Tennis i. Home Ec. 
Club I, Rainbow 3, 4. 



EDNA MclXTOSH — Ba.sketball team i. 

2, 3. Soltliall team 1. 2, 3, \olley Ball 
team I, J. 3. Red Cross i. Ring Tenni> 
Team I, 2. 3. Secretar>- of Class I. Home- 
making Club I. 

BETTY McKXKiHT — Student Patrol .• 

3. Home Ec. Club i. Red Cross 2, 3. Clas> 
Council I, St. Hall Sup. 4. 




^eiiwU 



BARBARA McLEAX— Intramural Sports 
I, 2. 3. Ring Tennis Team I, 2, \'olley 
Ball 2, Red Cross Representative 2. 3. 
Choral Club 3, 4. 

BE\ERLY McMICHAEL — F. T. A. 3. 
4, Song Leader of F. T. A. 3, Fire Ward- 
en 4. Keep Study Halls 3, 4, Intramural 
Sports I. 2. 3, 4. Choral Club 4. 

HILDA MOORE— Vice-president of Span- 
ish Club 3, Copy Editor of Annual 4. 

BARBARA A. MULCAY — F. T. A. 3, 4. 
Student Patrol i. Keep Study Halls 3, 4. 




BETTY MEEKS — Choral Club 1, 2. 3 
Red Cross 2. Assistant Nurse 3. Home 
Room Pres. I, Propram Chairman i. 



NANCY MONTGOirERY — Red Cross 
I, Choral Club 3. Rainbow 2. 3. 4. Libran- 
Assistant 2, J, Lunch Room Patrol 2, 3. 



KAY NEELANDS — Spanish Club 4 
Choral Club 2. 3, Honor Society 4. As 
sistant Page Editor Tubman Times 4. 
Senior Council 4. 



HELEN DcCHANT NELSON 



ANN" NEWTON — Sub. Lunch 3. 4, Li- 
brary 3. 4. Office 3. Red Cross Repre- 
sentative 2. 3. Soft Ball Team i. 2. Ring 
Tennis i. F. T. A. 3, Volley Ball i. EKi 
tion Committee 3. 



JANE NitVVTON 





.% 



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HONOR I.F.E ORAXDER 
.\IAR^ I'AUR 



ANNF, I'ARRISM — Stiulcnt Council i. J, 
,i, .|, Cfiitral CoiiiH-il 3. 4, Y Teens i. _', 
I'n'sidtiil I. Student Ratrol 2. 3, 4, Al- 
pha Tri Mi-^' 3, 4, IVesidenl 4, Honor 
Society 3. 4, Vice-president J, French 
Chill 4, Cliairmaii of Service Committee 
4, F^lcction Committee 3, Tubman Times 
4. Ass't. News F^ditor 4, Home Econo- 
mics Chill I, \'ice-prcsident i, Siiac'k Bar 
3, l.illlc Store 4, Cold T 3. 

IIAKKII'.TTE PERKINS — Class Council 
1, J. 3, 4, Red Cross Representative i, 
^ Teens I, J, Sludent i'atrol -', 3, 4, 
Alpha Tri Ili-^' 3. j. Secretary of the 
AI[)lia Tri l^i-^' 4, National Flonor So- 
ciety 3. 4, Secretary of National Hono:- 
Society 4, F. T. A. 3, 4, French Chili 4, 
F'reshman Raskethall 1. Sophomore Rin^; 
Tennis J. Tuhman Times 4. News F.di- 
tor 4, llonie Economics Cluli I. l*"-lection 
Connnittee 3. 



(.l.OKIA I'lllLl.ll'S — Annual Stall 4 
I'", r. A. 3, 4. Student I'atrol 3, Choral 
('lull J. 3. Snack Bar 4, Freshman RiiiR 
Tennis i. Red Cross Rep. i, 4, Study Hall 
Keeper 3, 4. Home F".c. Cluh 1, F.icclion 
Committee 3. 

•JEAN PITNER — Choral Club 4. Choir 3, 
4, Snacl; Bar 3, Art Editor of Tuhman 
Times 4. F-irst Aiil Room 4. 



SALLY NIXON — Vice-president Fresh. 
Class I, Jr. Red Cross Representative i, 
Theta Tri Hi-Y Secretary 4, Theta Tri 
Hi-Y Member 3, 4, Class Council i, 3, 
Secretary- of T. C. L. 4, Vice-president of 
F. T. A. Club 3, Asst. Page Editor Tub- 
man Times 3, Annual Club Editor 4, Stu- 
dent Patrol 4. 

BETTY NORVELL — Red Cross Repre- 
sentative 3, Snack Bar 3, Library Assis- 
tant 3, Annual Staff 4, Lost and Found i, 
Election Committee 3, Home Economics 
Club I. Freshman Ring Tennis i, F. T. 
A. 4, Softball I. 



GWYNNE ODUM — Annual Staff 4, 
Snack Bar 3, 4. Little Store i, 2, 3, 4, 
First Aid Room 4, Library Ass't. 3, Stu- 
dent Council 2, Election Committee 3, 
Freshman Ring Tennis i. 

JEAN OLIVEROS — Spanish Club 4. An- 
nual Staff 4. Student Patrol 3, Student 
Council I, 2, Home Economics Club i, 
Future Teachers of .America 4, Red Cross 
Representative 2, Y Teens I, Gold T 2, 
Silver T 3. 





LOIS PONU — Student r:itrol 2. Lunch 
Room 3, Snack Bar 4, Annual Staff 4. 

FRANCES POWELL — Annual Staff 4. 
Home Economics Club 2, Spanish Club 4. 

MARY POWELL — Alpha Tri Hi-Y 3, 
4, Spanish Club 4, Study Hall Helper 4. 
Student Patrol 2, Home Economics Club 
I, Annual Staff 3, Rainbow Girls 3, 4, 
Chemistry Lab. Assistant 4. Gold T 2. 



^. 



e/uoH 



XAXCY I'OW KLL — Home Economics 
Club 2, Red Cross Representative 3. 

HAZEL PRESCOTT — Home Economics 
riub I. Red Cross Representative 1. Tub- 
man Times 4, (Typist), Choir 2, Rin^ 
Tennis 3. 

JOYCE PRESCOTT — Red Cross Repre- 
sentative I. Home Economics Club i. 
Choral Club 3, 4. Choir 2, 3, 4. 



lOYCE PRIEST — Home Economics Clul. 
1, D. E. Club 3. 4. 

lAXE RAGSDALE -- Rainbow Girls 3. 
4, Alpha Tri Hi-Y 4. Silver T 4. Future 
Teachers of America 3, 4. Social Chair- 
man 4. Ass't. in Office 4. Business Staff 
of Tubman Times 2. Study Hall 3. 4. 
Cheer Leader 4, Lost and Found 4, Var- 
sity Basketball 2. 3, 4, T. H. S. i. T2, 
Star 3- 

FRAXKIE RAMSBOTHAM 





AW RAXKIX— Snack Bar 4, 
Kcd Cross, Election Commit- 
tee. 

BILLIEJEAX RUTH — Cho- 
ral Club 3, Spanish Club 3, 
Class Vice Prcs. 3, Class 
President 4, Senior Council 4, 
Business Editor Annual 
Staff 4, Tubman Times 4, 
\u Phi Mu 3, 4. Service 
Committee 4, T 3, Basket- 
ball A 4. 



ESTELLE REGOPOLOS — 
Class Council i, 3, 4, Presi- 
dent I, Point Manager 3. 
Vice President 4, Annual 
Staff 4, Junior Red Cross 2. 
Ring Tennis I, Silver T, 
Health and Sanitation Com- 
mittee 4, Student Patrol i. 

CONNIE SATCHER — Stu- 
dent Patrol I, 2, Fire Ward- 
en 4, Snack Bar 3, 4, Silver 
T 2, Gold T 3, Junior Red 
Cross 4. 



MILDRED RHODEN — Stu- 
dent Patrol 4, Home Econo- 
mics Club 1, Y Teens 2, Elec- 
tion Committee 2, 3. 

GRACE SATCHER — Red 
Cross Representative 2, Sec- 
retary Red Cross 2, Student 
Council I, Student Patrol 2, 
Tubman Times Staff 2, F. T. 
A. 3, 4, F. T. A. Study Hall 
Keeper 3, 4. Spanish Club 3, 
4, Sports I^etters T.H.S. i. 
Sports Letter T 3. Secretao' 
F. T. A. 3, 4, Health and 
Sanitation Com. 2, Election 
Committee i, 3, Ring Ten- 
nis I, 3. Volley Ball i, 3. 
Basketball i, 3, Gold T 2, 
Silver T 3. 



JOYCE RILEY— Study Hall 
Teacher 3, Home Economics 
Club I. 

JACKIE SHIPMAN — Theta- 
Tri-Hi-Y 3, 4. Tubman 
Times 3, Annual 4, Student 
Patrol 2, 3, 4, Red Cross 
Representative 3, Poster 
Committee 3, Health and 
Sanitation Com. 4, Snack 
Bar 2. 



tjPe^o/'^ 



KITTY SIBLEY — Thcta-Tri-Hi-Y 3, 4. 
Tubman Times Reporter 3, Annual (Bus- 
iness Staff) 4, Student Patrol 2, Home 
Room Point Manager 2, Service Com- 
mittee 3, President of Home Room 3. 
Silver T 2, Silver H 3. Class Council 2, 

3, Basketball Cheerleader 3, Ring Tennis 
2, Copy Editor of Annual. 

PEGGY SIMPSON — Home Economics 
Club I, Election Polls 2. 3. Library As- 
sistant 3, Study Hall Helper 3. 

BETTY JEAN SMITH— Library Assistant 

4. Lunchroom 3. 4, Rainbow Girls 3. 4, 
Worked at Election Polls 3, 4. 





DORIS SMITH — Home Economics Club 
I, Honor Roll i. Intramural Rins Tennis 
Team i, Intramural Basketball Team i. 
Intramural King Tennis 4, Study Hall 
Keeper 3. 

FAYE SMITH 

JUNE SMITH 



^i 



€^lf€i^ 



BETTY SORROW— D. O. E. Club. 

BII.LIE JEAN STOXE-Homc Ec. Club 
I. Tubman Times 4, Scnice Committee 
4, Rainliow Girls 2. 3, 4. 

ANX SUMMERALL 



JOYE SWEAKIXGEN— Student Patrol -'. 
Home Ec. Club i. First .\id Assi.siant 3. 
Class Coimcil 2. 

CAROL SYMMS— Home Ec. Club i. Rain- 
bow Girls 3, 4. Red Cross 3. 

PATTI ANN TARLYX— Student Patrol 
2, F. T. A. 3. 4. Social Committee 4. Al- 
pha Tri Hi Y 4, Varsity Basketball 4, 
Sen'icc Committee 4, Tubman Times 4. 




G^nm^ 



SARAH THIGPEN— Home Ec. Club 
Annual Staff 4. 

MARGIE THOMPSON 

JO-ANN THURMOND— Choral Club 3, 
Red Cross 4, 



VIRGINIA TOWILL— Basketball Team 2, 
Homeroom President i, 2, Homeroom 
Sec. & Treas. 3, 4, Annual Staff 3, Art 
Editor 3, 4, Student Patrol 2, 3. 4, Snack 
Bar 3, Theta Tri Hi Y 3. 4, Lost and 
Found Committee 3, Little T i, Silver 
T 2, Silver H 3. French Club 4. 

REHEAN USRY— Jr. Red Cross i, Home 
Ec. Club I, Student Patrol 2, Lost and 
Found Committee 2. Annual Staff 4. 
Tubman Times 4. Library Assistant 4. 
Snack Bar 4. 

MYRL WALKER 





ELIZA WALLACE 

HAZEL ANN WEATHERFORD — An- 
nual Staff 4. Home Ec. Club 1, Y Teens 

3. Class Council I. 2, Student Patrol 2. 

CAROLYN WHITLOCK— Tubman Times 

4. Student Patrol 4. Lost and Found Com- 
mittee 3, Ser\ice Committee 4. 



PEGGY WlI.KXSKY-IIomc Ec. Club i. 
Class Council 3. Publicity Committee 2. 
Annual Staff 4. Homeroom Sec. 2, Red 
Cross 4. President 4. Snack Bar 3. 

JOYCE WILK 



ELISE WILLIAMS- 
Gold T I. 



■Choral Club 




9^, 



€nw\:^ 



SOXDRA WILLIAMS — Homeroom Prcs. i, Home Ec. 
Club I. Sec. & Treas. I, Treas. Sopli. Class 2, Homeroom 
Point Manager 2, Pnblicity 2, T. C. L. Treas. 3, Home- 
room \icc President 3. Finance Committee 3. Chairman 
3. Study Hall Supervisor 3. Lunch Room 3, 4, Counted 
Snack Bar Money 3, Annual 4. Business Manager 4, Home- 
room Prcs. 4. 

ELSIE ANNE WILLIGE — Red Cross 2. 3, Alpha TrI Hi 
Y 3. 4. Home Ec. Clul> 2, Vice President of Homeroom 3. 
Rainbow Girls i, 2. 3, 4, Lab. Assistant 4. 4-H Club i, 1. 3, 4. 



NANCY WILLINGHAM — Alpha TrI Hi V 4, Varsity Bas- 
ketball 3. Student Patrol 2, Library Assistant 4. Home Ec. 
Club I, Class Council 3. 4, Sports Letters i. 2. THS i, T 2. 
Tri-Lan-ba. Intramurals 1. 2. Ring Tennis i. 2. \ollcybalI 
I. 2. Softball I. 2. 

CONNIE WILSON — Lunchroom 4. Sludcnt I'atrol 2, 
Home Ec. Club i. 



JOHNNIE WOMBLES — Lunchroom 3. 
4. Home Ec. Club i. 

MARY .10 WOOD — Student Patrol 1. 2. 
3. Theta TrI Hi Y 4. Homeroom Treasur- 
er 4. Red Cross 2. 3, Home Ec. Club i. 
T 2. Softball I. 2. 



BETTY WREN - 
Student Patrol 2. 



Home Ec. Club I. 2. 



MAKY ^"ARBROUGH — Snack Bar 4. 

MARY YOUNG — Vice President Home- 
room 2, Library Assistant 3, F. T. A. 4, 
Snack Bar 2, 3. 

DOROTHY WREN — Home Ec. Club i. 




/' 



umo/i^ 



"How diiz yo' sym'tiims seem ter segaslmate?" sez Brer Rabbit, sezee. Brer 
Fox, he wink his eye slow, en lay low en de Tar-Baby, she ain't sayin' notliin'/' 







Caroline Kiiliikf, Hflorrv L(iu:m. ( niiiiic hilih, Betty Beeson, 
Judy McLaugliliii. 




COPYWRIGHT 
WALT DISNEY PRODUCTIONS 

OFFICERS 

President CONNIE TABB 

Vice-President CAROLINE KUHLKE 

Secretary DELORES LOGAN 

Treasurer JUDY McLAUGHLIN 

Point-Manager BETTY BEESON 

Sponsor : Miss Gertrude Comey 



JUNIOR - SOPHOMORE COUNCIL 




I'irst Row. Caroline Kuhlkc, Betty lolu-ii, Pal Baker, Connie Havird. Betty Beeson. Beltx M>ers, I'at McDonaUl, Marilvn ( iiam- 
bers. 

Second Rnzc: Carol Bennett. Virginia Moffmaii. Marcia Levy, Marcia Anstcd. jud\ MtL;uii:IiIiu. Martha Henistreet. Joanne Har- 
bin, Louise Wardlaw. Jean Huyck, Sara Stringier, Uclores Logan. 

Third Rm^'\ Barbara Stapleton. lmo|.;eiic Cox, Mary Ann HiRhtower. Alice Bonnes. Margaret Ivic, Mar\ Alice Sumerau. (ieneva 
Atkins, MarRUcrite ^iarschalk, Connie Tabb, Betty Bennett, Joy Stockton. Mildred Jones, Amy Mnrpliy, Betty McGahee, Rita 
Calhoun, Suzanne Morris. 




Alice AiKlcT>on. Betty Jo Anderson. Marcia Anstcd. Geneva Atkins, Margie Avrct 

Luna Avers, Roberta Bailey. Pal Baker. Annette Banks. Sliirley Banks 

Shirley Barfield. Doris Bearden. Barbara Becknell. Man, Becknell. Patsy Bceland 

Betty Beeson, Mar\- Belger. A^nes Bennett. Betty Bennett. Xancy Beiniett 

Naomi Bennett. Dorothy Belts. Beverly Blemkcr. Patricia Brickie. Margaret Brown 



/' 



uni€/i^ 




Paula Bruce. Betty Buffington, Man- Alice Burch, Barbara Bundsclio. Peggy Burns 
Shirley Burton, Rita Calhoun, Roberta Cairipbell, Ann Canipe, Glenn Carlton 
Walton Carpenter, Marilyn Chambers, Joe Ann Cbceley. Barbara Clary, Betty Cohen 
Ann Coleman, Elizabeth Cooper, Sara Corbin, Mary Ann Cosey, Carolyn Coward 
Imogene Cox, June Crawford, Shirley Crawford, Betty Crook, Libby Crouch 



^unio^^ 




Frances Crouch. Evelyn Danforth. Caroline Davis. Patti Dent. Ruth Ann Dozier 
Angelyn Drew, Patricia Diinaway, Jcancltc Epps. Ann Eubanks. Barbara Eubanks 
Bobbie Jean Farr, Madeline Fcrst. Elynor Fortune. Winton Foster. Mar> Ann FuUcrton 
Laura Ann Caddy, jerrylena Gay, June Gay, Patricia Gladin. Ntar>' Glcalon 
Emma Goodwin, Carrie Greene, Laura Gregory, Margaret Griffis, Pegpy Grimaiid 




Margie Guy. Patsy Haniiltoii. lo.miu ll.irlun, Evelyn Harmon, Geraldinc Harper 
Helen Harris, Connie Havird. Slurlt.> Ikatli, Martha Hemstreet, Man,- Ann Hiv:hlo\ver 
Joan Hill. Katharine Hill. Marian Hill, \'ir^iinia I.ee Hoffman, Beatrice Howard 
Marcella Howard, Tatsy Howard. Ainiif lloiner. Kosalinde Homo, jniie Hnlcheson 
Jean Hiiyck, Hjirhara Ivey. Maryarel ivie. Kntli Jansen, E\elyn Jessup 



^iinwU 





0^€^ 




Bcttv Joe. Marv Elizabeth Jolinson. Dorothy Johnston, f'atsy Jones. Kuth Jump 
lacirene Kearsci Peggy King. Sylvia Kinsc-y, Betty Jean Kitchens. June Kitchens 
Caroline Kuhlke. Barbara Lang. Joanne Lanier. Kmestinc Law, Cleo Lawton 
Toy Leaptrot. Marcia Levy, Margie Lewis. Tirace Lindsey. M.irtha Lively 
Dolores Llovd, Dolores Logan, Lora Lcc Lutes, Ruth Maddox, Lois Malcom 



/' 



unw/ii^ 




Marcueritc 'Mar-ihalk. I'.ilrici.i M.ir-liall, IVu'^rv Mam. ill. Sia Martin. I'.arl.ara Malhcnv 
Betty Tean Matthews, Margie McAllian>. !'at .McDonald. Doroihy Mcl-.lvci-n, Bitty XIcGaliee 
Mary McKennev, Tcanic McKcttrick, Judy Mci.ansldin. B.irl.ara McMinn. .Ann Mender 
Barbara Metts, 'Margie Miller, Kcmniie .\Iixon, Betty Jean Miintpomery, \irj;inia Morgan 
Suzanne Morris, Helen Moiitos, Christine Murphy, Jean Murphy, Switzer Murphy 




i-Lttv Mvers, lune ihrick. Mar.^art-t ^\•^^man. Don~ Xov.,ik, Ann ii\n. r 

Martha iParrish, Carolyn Peacock, Jacqiiclyiine Philpot. Ann I'inkston, Jcanctte Prcscott 

Eva Price, Minnie Lee Price, Marj- Ramsay, Joyce Ratlibnrn, Mary Anne Redmond 

Edna Reid, Anne Richards, Betty Roe. .\iildrcd Ruben, Sadie Scott 

Mary Sellers, Joanne Shapiro, Sue Simmons, Sue Simowilz, Betty Singletary 



/' 



unio^i^ 




L.i 





I- 





Sue Skelton, Gcraldine Smalley, Dorothy Smith, Ethel Smith, Kathleen Smith 
Dolores Spires, Barbara Stapleton. joy Stockton. Ann Story. Sara Stringer 
Mary Alice Sumerau, Connie Tahh, (iaylc Tanner. Marilyn Tancnbaum. Jean Temples 
F.velyn Teskey, Ann Thompson. Carol Thompson, Kdna Thompson. Joyce Thrift 
Kathryn Trapncll. Jean Ttitcn, Barbara Usr)-, Hazel Waldcn, Louise Walker 



/' 



uni€/i^ 




SUGAR CANE 
"Take yo' too fit's en ffiiyazc it. 
Take yo* toofies eti stitc it. 
Saxv it en yoke it. 
En den you kin broke it." 



Tallulah Wall, Louise Wardlaw. Alice Wliitc 
Eleanor Whitfield. Erlinc Wilk. Shirley Williams 
Vera Williamson, Maria Wilson, Nell Wilson 



PLANTATION' PROVERBS 
"Sifter hole water lame ez a tray, 
Ef you fill it uid moss en dob it wid clay; 
De Fox git madder de longer you stay — 
Fill it aid moss en dob it uid clay." 




lAk. 

Margaret Woodward Zona VWight 



"Fine tun i^'har you zk'UI en lij'en you may," remarked Vnelc Remus with emphasis, 

"<j''od cUUluns allrrs (jtfs tuck kccr on" 




Carol Bennett, Connie Clark, Margie Clark. Barbara Clark. Jean Damren 
Barbnra Dukes, Marparct Fair. Joyce Fricks Virginia Gilhcrt. Pauline Gordon 
Dell Hall, Xancy Johnson. Mildred Jones. Daisy Kniplit. Nancy Joe Labouseur 
Mary Lamb, Lois Lantz, Man.- Leiirliton. Betty Mock, Mari^aret Morris 
Amy Murphj-. Dorothy Xcllierland, Joyce Pike, Dorothy Potcet. Jean Stewart 
Gloria Utlcy, Frances Bratcher, Betty Jo Dyson, Juanita \\ inningham 



Ol. 




■men 



"De place wharhouts you spill de grease. 
Right dar youcr houn' ter slide, 
An' wliar you fine a hunch er lui*r. 
You'll sholy fine dc hide." 





Sue 1 " 'xiodwin. l"'.vclyn Bcckiim 

Kobcrla Cr;i\\lord, Shellcv Beard 



COI'YRIC.HT 
WM.r niSNEY PROIU'CTIONS 



OFFICERS 

President FAELYN BFXKl'M 

( iee-President MARTHA GOODVVI N 

Secretary SUE BERRY 

Treasurer ROBERTA CRAWFORD 

Point Manager SHELLEY BEARD 

Sponsor : Miss Bertha Carswcll 



FKI'-SIIMAX ri)r\r|i. 




First Row: Sue Berr>'. Martlia Goodwin, Jane Eubanks, Anne Hankinson, Louise McGaliee, Frances Seize, Ann Puscy. 
Jackie Murray. \\'illimcna Adams. 

Second Row: Eleanor Roberts. Beverly Farr. Margaret Thompson, Patt\' Zurriuli, Nancy Trimmicr, Ann Mnra, Hazel 
Price, Carol Benson, Sue Carswell. Kitty Dessauer, Evelyn Bcckum. 

T/iirrf /Jou' : Vivian Kitchens. Denzellmay Johnston. Pickens Cook. Mary Helen Phillips, Joyce Powell. Norma Linthicum, 
Miriam Cale, Jeanette Strinper. Mary Davis, Gloria Steinhurg, Shelley Beard. Sandra Harle\-. Martha Lewis, Barbara 
Bannester, Pam Strauss, Roberta Crawford, Jane Wren. 



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"Skin mc, Brer Fox" sec Brer Rabbit, scccc^ "snatch out my 
eyeballs, i'ar out ir.y years by de roots, en cut off tny legs." 
sezee, "but do please. Brer Fox. don't fling me in dot brier- 
patch," sezec. 



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COPYRIGHT 
WALT DISNEY PRODUCTIONS 



OFFICERS 

President CAROLYN MAGRUDER 

Vice-President ADELAIDE FUND 

Secretary BETTY JANE ARNOLD 

Treasurer JEAN WOODWARD 

Point Manager SANDRA WHEELER 

Sponsor: Miss Vallusia Anchors 



Bett\- Jaiic Arnold, Carol\n Mapruder. Adelaide Fund, 
Jean Woodward, Sandra Wheeler 



EIGHTH GRADE COUNCIL 




/•'ir.v/ mil'; I'aii^e Hoifman, Fave McXnre. Ellen I'ricc, Kalheriiic Bailey, Billic Holl(>\\a\. Mari;are( I'uckell, Carolyn Ma.unider, 
Jean Woodward, Adelaide I'inid. Sandra Wheeler, Betty Jane Arnold, Anne Lowery. Catherine Folk, \era Price, Barhara 
Ann Dixon, Ann Satcher. M;nil.\n F'vans, Patty Strong, Carolyn Bowcn. 

Second rme: Wandra Jowers, Mary Alice Crouch, PcRsy Peacock, Martha Harden, Pauline Johnson, Joyce Knotls, Barhara I.iii- 
Ihicnm, Margot Teagne, Kay Weeks, Sara Johnson, Kent Andrews, Dorothy Barker, Dawn Peacock, Phylis Pearre, Joan 
Watkins. 

Third row: Marianna Cato, Joanne Scot, Audrey Free, Betty Powell, FIclcn Smith, \'iri;inia Connell, Carolyn Griffis, Patricia 
Hall, Becky Wilhanks, Louisa Mallard, Mo/clle Owens, Nan Williams, Dolt.\ Zurfluk, Mary Clark, Joan Jeffcoal. 



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aVVkeeley Q-.Wylie 



aui/iei/fi titles 

On the following pages "Maids and a Man" proudly pre- 
sents the eight outstanding personalities of 1950 who hove 
been chosen by popular vote of the Senior Class as Senior 
Superlatives. 



THINK ON THESE THINGS 

Whatsoever things are true, 
Whatsoever things are honest, 
Whatsoever things are just, 
Whatsoever things are pure. 
Whatsoever things are lovely. 
Whatsoever things are of good report; 
If there be any virtue, and 
If there be any praise. 
Think on these things. — Philippions 4:8 



The scltini/s for Si'iiior Siif*i'rlatii I's wcrr (fcniToiisly fttniisltcd by tlic 
Augusta Xaliviwl C>lf Club 



^eU fL^M tsd^und 




ANXE CARMICHAEL 



S^c/wiciuki^t 




JANE HENG 



G^fMyii^mtJiM^Ai^i 




BEXGO\AX GEORGE 




CAROLYN BUTLER 



&^efkMiuliiu 




AUSTIN GILLILAXD 




HARRIETTE TERKIXS 



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lANE KAGSUALE 




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EDITORS 



LITERARY STAFF 




.\fARTHA DYE 
Edilor-iii-Cliiff 



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Lait,:r-w-i ,v..-i MAkTIlA DYK 

An liditor VIRGIXIA TOVVILE 

f'ichire Editor ANNE CAKMICHAE). 

Literary Editor JANE HENG 

Club Editor SALLY NIXON 

Cofy Editors MARY LYNN, HILIM MOORE 

Ereshman Eaitor GRACE MOLINEUX 

Eiijhth Grade Editor MARTHA HARDEN 

Sponsor: Miss .l:i(|ticlin Marshall 




First Rme: Barbara Glass. Gloria Phillips, Hazel Wcalherford, Belly Nor\cll, Martha Dye, Betty Becson, Jane Henp, Caroline Kniiike, 
Mary Ruth Bridges, Margaret Dje, Mar\ Ramsay. 

Second Row. Genie Perkins, Sally Nixon, Lora Lee Lntes, Frances Powell, Suzanne Morris, Xir^inia Towill. Gwynne Odum, Hilda Moore, 
Sara Thigpcn, Annette Banks! Marcia Anstcd, Beverly Farr. Nina Thomas, Kent Andrews. 

Third Rou: Martha Goodwin. Roscmar\- Fccse, Joan Griffin, Lavem Davis, Marjorie Jennings. Joe Ann Hendri.\. Geneva Atkins. Bar- 
bara Bundscho, Jackie Shipman, Roberta Bailey, Jo-Ann Clieeley, J oycc Wilk, Rehean Usry, Grace Mollncux, Martha Harden, Joyce 
Hodges. 



tM fL/UeiM 



EDITORS 




Lois Pond, Sondra Williams, Kitty Sibley, BiUie Jean Ruth. 

Busmess Manager SONDRA WILLIAMS 

Ar\ Editor LOIS POND 

Copy Editor KITTY SIBLEY 

Advcrliscmcnt Editor BILLIE JEAX RUTH 

Faculty Sponsor: Mrs. Ethel Sigman 



BUSINESS STAFF 




SONDRA WILLIAMS 
Business Manager 




First Ro%^': Sondra Williams, Beatrice Howard. Shirley Burton. Louise McGahec. Helen Montos. I'cjisy W ilensky, Sara Galloway. Walton 
Carpenter, Estellc Rcpopolos, Virginia Bowc, Martha Hemstreet. 

Second Ran-: Barbara Eiibanks. Lois Pond, Mollie Burdell, Kitty Sibley. Joanne Harbin, Shirley Heath, Kay Weeks, Frances Setzc. Caro- 
lyn Magrudcr, Grace Merry, .Marcella Howard, Cotniic Tabb, Switzer Murphy, Connie Hayird. 

Third A'nie: Billie Jean Ruth, .\nn llankinson. Mary Martin, Sue Berry, Nellie Grace Carter. Amy Brown, Elizabeth Lehmann, Adelaide 
I'luul, Betty Mctiahec, Jean Olivcros, Barbara Metis. 



Editor-in-Chief 
ROSLYN BOGESLOV 

Managing Editor 
PAT MARBUT 

Art Editors 
KATHERIXE HILL 

JEAN PITXER 
Sponsors : 

Mrs. Flora C. Thompson 
Miss Vallusia Anchors 




^fd 



man 



ROSI.VN' BOGESLOV 
Editor-in-Chief 

REPORTERS 




iirsi Kuu . I'.iiil.i Llriicc. Sara Ijalloway, Billic Sloiic, BL-tt> Rot. 

Second Roii-\ I-ora Lcc Lutes, KosKn BoRCsIov, Billic Jean Rutii, Sue Skcllon, Marcia 

Anstcd, Marcia Levy. Sara SiriiiKcr 
Third Koie: Nancy Johnson. Jnanita \\innini;l'ani, Mary Clark. .Sandra McC'onncll 
l-ourlh Role: Betty Luckey, Betty Jean Fell. Helen I). N'elson 



EDITORIAL STAKE 




Seaici: (L. to R.) Cvntliia Bolton, Harruttf l'l■rkMl^, I'at Marlint, Koslvn BoKe5lov, Barhara Allen, Bcttv 
Clark 

Standing: Kay Neclands. Jndy McLaughlin, .Ann Tarrish. Helen Harris, Marjorie Jennings. Nclle Ruth 
Guill, Betty Bennett, Bengovan George 



^ime^ 




JOANNE HARBIN 
Business Manager 



Business Manager 
JOANNE HARBIN 

Exchange Editor 
JEAN HUYCK 

Circulation Manager 
CAROLYN WHITLOCK 




Seated: Grace Molineux, Carolyn Wliitlock. Jean Bowick, Vivian Balkcum, Katlierinc Hill 
Standing: Jean Huyck, Jean Pitner, Jeanine Mays, Hazel Prescott 



ADVERTISIXG SOLICITORS 




First Ri,ic : Carol.Nn \\liitl<Hk. I ii'nic Perkins. Glenda Henderson. Joanne Harbin, Angie Drew, Joy 
Stockton 

Second Roic: Ro.semary Feese, Barbara Morris, Shelley Beprd, Mary Davis. Alice Ogden, Lonise Ward 
law. Virf;inia Bowe, Jcarcttc Strinper, Mar>- Ann Oaklej 

Bach Ron:: Martha Smith, Nancy Trimmier, Beverly Smith 



tAhiiiynai t^ono^ tJrocietu 



NATIONAL 
HONOR SOCIETY 



Tlic Tubman Chapter of tlic Natitmal Honor Society consists of Seniors and 
Juniors wiio have spent at least one semester in Tviliman and liavc creditahl_\- dem- 
onstrated tlic tour cardinal principles of tlie Sociel\- : Scholarship, Leadership, Ser- 
vice, and Character. The purpose of this organization is to create an enthusiasm for 
scholarship, to stimulate a desire to render service, to promote \\orth\ leadership, 
and to encourage tlie development of character in iiupils r,f Tiihrnan !lii;h School. 




OFFICERS 

President JAXE HKMJ 

Vicc-Presidcnl ANNE I'AKRISH 

Secretary HAKRIF.TTE I'KKKIXS 

Treasurer M I SS M ABEL H V K 1 ) 

NEW HONOR SOCIETY MEMBERS 

Jewell Beniley, Mary Rulli Bridi^cs, Carolyn 
Butler, Betty Becson, Betty Cohen, Helen Harris, 
Connie Havird, Martha Hemstreel. Ruth lansen. 
Ruth Jump, Caroline Knlilke, Delores LoB.in, Bar- 
bara Staplcton, Gaylc Tanner 




Harriette Perkins, Jane Henn, Miss .\laliel Byrd, .\nne r.iiiisli 




First Row: Sally Nixon. Saul Sin Loo, Harriette Perkins. Miss Byrd, Jane HenR. Anne Parrish 

Second Roxe: Martha Dye. Harriet Jiie, Joan Griffen, Marjoric Jennings, Pat Marlmt, Kay Neclands, Cynthia Bol- 
ton, Barbara Allen, Roslyn Bogcslov, Ncllc Ruth Gnill, Sara Galloway. Elorrie Fleming. 



&ui^man ^Ui^en^At^ ^^euaue 




OFFICERS 

President FLORRIE FLEMING 

Viee-Presideni MARCELLA HOWARD 

Secrelary SALLY NIXON 

Treasurer ANNETTE BANKS 

Point Manager WALTON CARPENTER 

Patrol Captain ANNE CARMICHAEL 

Sponsors: Miss A. Dorotliv Hains 
Miss Belle Walker 



Seated: Sally Nixon, Fiorrie Fleming, MarccUa Howard 
Standing : Anne Carmichae!, Walton Carpenter, Annette Banks 



CENTRAL COUNCIL 




Pront Row: Left to riylit : Bclt\ .huK- AruoUi, I'onnie Talib. CaroKn M;ii;rndLT. l''kn rie Flcminy, Jewell Heiule>. S\l\ia M.irkert 

Second Roxt<\ Cynthia Bolton. Annette Banks. Martli.i Dye. Ma rcella Howard. Delores Loyan. .lane Hen^;. Roslyn Boncslov. 
Walton Carpenter. Martha Hemstreet 

Back Row: Sne Berry. Barhara Allen, Anne Parrish. Betty Lnekey. Sally Xixt)n, .^andra .Mel'onnell. Bengovan George. Patsy 
Blanchard 



tFiudent {Patwl 



JUNIOR PATROL 




Scaled: Walton Carpenter. Man, Kani>ay. Marian Hill. Betty Htlmly. Glcnda Henderson. 
Caroline Kuhlke, Helen Monlos. ("onnie Talib 

Standiiig: Ann Stone. Jackie Miller. Barbara Enbanks. Joyce Thrift. Connie Havird, Helen 
Harris, Betty Beeson. ^[a^tlla Hcmstreet. Suzanne NIorris. Marcella Howard. Katlilecn 
Smith, Sue Martin. (Geneva Atkins. Annette Banks. Marcia Ansted 

SENIOR PATROL 




/'.((.,., ^.,r•.n,l: A.\.\E lAKMU IIAEL 




First Row. Glcnda Henderson. Carolyn Whitlock. Anne Parrish, Harriette Perkins, Virginia Towill. Florric Fleming 
Second Kmv: Mollic Burdcll. Jackie Shipman. Joan Griffin. Ann Livingston, Roslyn Bogcslov, Sally Nixon 
Third Row. Bengovan George, Betty Jo Home. Christine Barrs, Carolyn Kennedy. 




= ^unm^ 



Med 



"Tribbalashun seem like 
she's a icaitin' raiin' de cont- 
der fer ter ketch one en all 
un us, honey" 

OFFICERS 

President 
PEGGY WILEXSKV 

I 'ice-President 
SUE MARTIN" 

Sec. and Treas. 
GAIL DuPUIS 

Sponsor 
Miss Dorothv Moore 



AL-li Biancii'ird. Mary Alice Bkiir. Joan Fulnier, Betty Jean Fell. Xelle Ruth Giiill, Grace Harris. Ann Xewton. Saul Lm Lou, 
Connie Satcher. Gloria Phillips, Peggry W'ilensky. Jo Ann Thurmond. Paula Bruce. Dorothy Belts. Ruth Ann Dozier. Carolyn 
Davis, Madeline Ferst. Ann Eubanks, Margaret Ivie. Marian Hill, Sue Martin, Sylvia Kinsey, Ann Menger. Ann Oxner. Mary Ann 
Redmond. Betty Singletary, Betty Usn.-. Marilyn Tanenbaum, Connie Clark. Barbara Dukes. Patsy Johnson. Miriam Hopkins. 
Martha Walker. Pat Williams, Joanne Beattie. Sara Bagby. Janet Buckner, Rita Brown, Gail DuPuis. Rosemar>- Feese. Connie 
Hayes, Irene Fordham. Vernel Jackson, Jackelyn Hutchens. Jill Mudgett. Man,- Martin, Marjorie Xewton, Alice Ogden, Mary Jane 
kufo, Kathcrine Scales. Martha Smith, Lorita Sweat. Elizabeth Williams, Fay Wilkinson, Dorothy Bailey. Mary Lee Ayer. Xlna 
Brown, Martha Cain. Bea Dodd, Helen Daniels, Jean Fricks. Mary Ann Epps, Betty Harter. Joyce Hodges. Christine Hundley. 
Shirley Jackson. Bobbie McDonald, Caro McDonald, Rose Lee Oldfield. Helen Myrick, Jerry Anne Reese, Barbara Pniitt. Sara 
Scogpins. Patricia Salley, Sliirley Tarlyn, Margot Teague, Patricia Wolt, Joyce \Vall. 

Snack Bar and 
Fire Wardens Student Store Managers Office Assistants 




^^^Bmt 






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SERVICE GROUPS 

Under the sponsorship of the Tubman Citi- 
zenship League, students render various 
valuable ser\ices to the student body. Un- 
der the Point System, many ser\'ice points 
are earned througli student assistantships 
which are recognized at Graduation on 
Awards Dav. 



Projector Group 



Lilirar\- .Assistants 
CLASSROOM MOVIE PROJECTOR OPERATORS ORGAXIZED 
When you sec two girls hurrxing through the iialls carrying what appears to he a very" 
heavy suitcase, a large screen and a small tool box. you can just he sure that a team of movie 
projector operators is going into action. This year a group of fifteen students has been 
trained to operate the chissroom movie projector. .\ team of two operators is available for 
each of the six periods during the school day. When a member of the faculty wishes to 
liave a movie shown in her classroom, all she has to do is notify the faculty sponsor of the 
group, who in turn directs the individual teams as they are needed. For weeks, these girls 
spent their activities periods learning to operate llie projector. After they became sufficient- 
ly skilled to handle the machine without N*^upcr\ision, they were placed on call. To date each 
operator has given on an average of three study halls a week to showing films. Being a 
movie operator has its advantages and disadvantages; these girls are called out of study 
halls several times a week but they never miss a movie. 

We commend the following girls for their willingness to cive of their time and of their 
to the faculty and to the student body. 

Carolyn Bohler CaroUn Hadden Anne Livingston 

Jean Bowick Annette Harper Dorothy McElveen 

Man. Ann Cox Joann Ford Anne Richards 

Jeanne Damren C\-nthia Holston Mildred Ruben 

Barbara Glass Nfar\- Elizabeth Johnson Marian Blackstone 

Paculty Sponsor: Miss Marie Hulbcrt 



^{din ^liii 



sponsor: Miss Ruth McAuliffe 

First Rou-: Caroline Kuhlke, Betty Bee- 
son, Martha Hemstrect, Marcella How- 
ard 

Second /full': Mar\ Ramsay. Lora Lee 
Lutes. Helen Harris. Walton Carpenter. 
Vera Williamson, June Myrick. Connie 
Tal)b. Suzanne Morris. Marparet Grif- 
fis 

Third Roic: Betty McGabcc. Patricia 
Dunaway, Talhilah Wall. Betty Roe. 
Ruth Jansen. Marpuerite Marschalk. 
Ruth Jump. Evelyn Tesky. Betty Cohen. 
Connie Havird, Helen Moutos, Caro- 
lyn Peacock 




f^Ji€Hc/i (r/fff 




OFFICF.RS 

t 

rr,:ud,-nl BAKHAKA ALLEN 

; i. .•-/'r.-.tWfii/ ROSLYN BOGF.SLOV 

.SVir.-/,iry GKACF IIAURI.'^ 

Treasurer SHIRLEY ALLIiCJOlJ 

Sfunsor : Miss Winnie Ovcrstrcet 



Harriette Perkins. Jewell Bcntley. Gloria Johnson, Virginia Towill, Shirley Allpood. Grace 
Harris, Roslyn Bogeslov, Barbara Allen, Carolyn Kennedy, Florric Flemins. Saul Sin Loo. 
Lillian Harter, Martha Dye, Pat Marbut. Anne Parrish. Jane Heng 







OFFICERS 

President CVXTHIA BOLTON 

Vice-President KAY XEELAXDS 

Secretary BETTY COHEX 

Treasurer WALTOX CARPEXTER 

Sponsor: Mrs. Sue Wade Byrd 



first 



st Roix:: Seated; Sylvia Melton. Ann Livingston, Kathleen Smith, Carolyn Butler. Xelle 
Ruth Guill, Man- Ruth Bridges, Jean Oliveros. Cynthia Bolton, Kay Xeelands. Marcella 
Howard. Martha Hemstreet, Frankic Ramsbotham. Judy McLaughlin, Libby Crouch, 
Grace Satchcr. Sara Stringer, Glendn Henderson. Mrs. Sue Wade Byrd 

Second Roix.' : Standing : Mary Anne Cose\', Jean Huyck, Mar\' Powell, Caroline Kuhlke, 
Betty Joe, Marcia Levy, Mildred Ruben. Patricia Gladden, Betty Cohen. Walton Carpenter 

Third Row: Lora Lee Lutes, Marian Hill, Mary Ramsay, Betty Beeson. Helen Harris, Anne 
Canipe, Frances Powell. Harriet Jue. Betty Helmly, Glenn Carlton, Evelyn Jessup, Mar- 
guerite Marschalk, Carolyn Eubanks 



^ieano/i 0^€€iimUa/ii ^liiS^ 



FUTURE TEACHERS OF AMEKITA 

OFFICERS 

Prcxidcnl BEXGO\"AN GEORGE 

Vicc-PrcMcnl BETTY JO HORXE 

Secr-elary GRACE SATCHEk 

Treasurer PAULA BRUCE 

Sponsors: Miss Amabel L;insdill 
Miss Sar:i Fiillbri^lil 




first Rom.' 
Second Ko 



Patli Ann TarU 



Xancy \\'illinj;liam, (jloria Phillips. Jane Kagsdale 

Annette Banks. Gloria Johnson. Elsie Ann Willise. Betty Myers. Grace Satch- 
cr, Bengovan (Joori^c. Betty Jo Home. Beverly McMichael. Kathleen Smith. Mary Ruth 
Bridges, Nellc Winn Blanchard 

Third RoxU: Martha Dye, Wanda Mathews, Jean Oliveros. Betty Xor\cll. Carolyn Haddcn, 
Ann Richards, Helen Xclson, Ann Canipe, Rita Calhoun. Betty Grimslead, Mar\- Ann 
Cosev, Xelle Ruth Guill, Marcia Anstcd, Saul Sin Loo 




M4^ 



OFFirKRS 

/■rcsidntl SANDRA McC:ONNELL 

I 'U-c-l'n-sidnil ANNE CARMICHAEL 

•NVcrWarv SALLY NIXON 

Tn-asiin-r VIRGINIA TOWILL 

(7»i/./<iiii CAROLYN II AnOEK 

Sfionsor: Mrs. GeorRc Sililcv, Jr. 



Left to ri.ylit : \'irgiiii:i To«ill. (^irdlu. H:ii|(k-n, S^i'uini .\U-( uiiiHli. Sall\ Xixon. 

Anne Carmichacl 












-^*.<'- 



tha Hemstreet. Judy McLaiiplilin 



lii.ii;, KUni^ir. h..l .'.U l-l.tcii, Ju.inUL Hjrl.in, .slnrli;. Ili..l!i, M.ii 



Second Row Margaret Grifl'is. Betty Beeson, Marcclla Howard. Lora Lee Lutes. Walton Carpenter, Mary Ramsay, Connie 
Tabb, Sandra McConnell. Florrie Fleming. .lane HeuK, VirRinia Tow ill. Annie Drew. Louise Wardlavv, Anne Carmichacl, 
Austin Gilliland, Jane Huguley, Carolyn Hadden, Jackie Sliipman, Kitty Sibley, Mary Jo Wood 



MfiAa &'u-.:^i4^ 



OFFICERS 

President ANNE PARRISH 

Vice-President GRACE HARRIS 

Seeretary HARRIETTE PERKINS 

Treasurer ANN LIVINGSTON 

Chaplain BETTY JO HORNE 




First Rozc: Left to right: Harriette Perkins, Anne Parrish, 

Ann Livingston 
Seeond Roiv: Bett\ Jo Home, Grace Harris 




First K,,u': Bi'lt.\ M.\ers, Pat Baker, Anne Oxncr, Connie Havird, Joan Hill, Joy Stockton, Grace Harris. Betty Bennett, Suzanne Morris 
Seeund liim: Annette Banks, Marcia Ansted, Ann Livingston, Caroline Davis. Katlierinc Hill, Anne Enlmnks. Xancy WillinKliam. Benpovan 

George, Palli-Aini Tarlyn, Shirley Allgootl, Relty jo Home, Jean Bowick, Sara Galloway, Marian Hill 
Third K'Ui': Katlileen Smith, Carolyn Butler, Jane Ragsdale, Mary Powell, Anne Parrish, Betty Blancliard, Jewell Bcntley, Elsie Ann Wil- 

lige, I larriette Perkins 



J 




Wwm/^€/uS 



"Rooster makes mo' rackcl dan dc hin n-'at Uiy dc oiy.' 



BY BARBARA McLEAN 



OFFICERS 




/•'irst /?(»tv' : Marian Haywood, Mis:> Halbcrt, Sylvia 
Markcrt 

Scioud A' I til- : Sylvia Nfclton, Imoycnc Cox. Patsy 
Blaiicliard, Icwcll Bcntlcv 



SEXTET CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

Ucc. 14 Talent Show Tubman 
Feb. 45 Optimist Club Lunclieon 
Feb. 23 Qnota Club Supper 
Mar. I Martha Lester P. T. A. 
Mar. 2 Y. W. C. A. Annual Luncheon 
Mar. 3 G. A, S. C. Banquet. Bon Air 
Mar. 17 Lions Chib Luncheon 
Mar. 28 Rotan- Club 

Apr. 15 Convention luncheon for AAL'W 
Sprinjr Concert (to be announced) 




Gloria Johnsc>n. .^andra McConnell. .Marnarcl Kccdcr. 
Sylvia Melton, Shirley AU^ood. Jewell Bentk-y 




TUBMAN CHORAL CLUB 

first Sopranos: Patsy Blancbard, Carolyn Bohler, Carol Caddcn. ImoRcne Cox. Barbara 
Dukes. Carolyn Eubanks, Betty lirimstead. Evelyn jessup, 'iloria Johnson. Sandra Mc- 
Connell, Beverly McMichael. Betty Jean Montpomen,-. Mary Alice Sumcniu 

Second Sopranos: Mar\ Ruth Bridges. Shirley Crawford. Pat Marbut. Sylvia Melton, Kay 
Neelands, Jacquelynnc Philpot, Joyce Rathbim, Margaret Rccdcr 

Altos: Barbara Allen. Shirley Allpood. Jewell Bentley, Lois Dozier, Anne Eubanks, Jo- 
Anne Ford. Jean Graham, Peppy Marriott. Jcanine Mays, Barbara McLean. Jean Pit- 
ner, Joyce Prcscolt. Mary Ann Redmond 

Accompanists : Marian Haygood, Sylvia Markert 



I ai.i-.nhar of events 

(MORAL CLUB 

10 Parents Night Tulmian 

13 Organ Guild Concert at First 



Presbyterian Cburcb 
Nov. Ji Assembly. Senior 
Nov. 22 Assembly, Junior 
Nov. 27 Mann Memorial Church 
Dec. I Altriisa Chapter Dinner at 

Partridge Inn 
Dec. .| .'\. M. Triiiity-on-tbe-Hill Church 

P. M. Biihltliem Center 
Dec. II Christmas Carol Programme, 

Municipal Auditorium 
Dec. 13 Oliver r,L'neral Hospital 
Jan. 8 First Baptist Church 
Feb. 5 St. John Church 
Mar. 3 G. A. S. C. Convention, 

Morning session 
Mar. 10 Honor Society Induction 
Mar. 12 First Presbyterian Church 
Mar. 20 Camp Gordon Service Club No. I 
Apr. 16 Hill Baptist Cliurch 
May 7 Rcid Memorial Church 
Operetta False Fernando. .Spring Concert 

and Banquet to be announced. 



^^e^A 



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€H 




CHOIR OFFICERS 



Bv ANN BIEDERMAN 




President SYLVIA MARKERT 

Vice-President MARY JANE MARBUT 

Secretary-Treasurer GLORIA STEINBURG 




Fay Adams 
Carolyn Adcock 
Jo Anne Anchors 
Sara Bagl)y 
I >urothy Bcale 
Hi-itv Bt-a^lcv 
Jiuly HfckK-\ 
( (insianic BciiiK-tt 
Ann Kii'dt-rman 
\'irL;inla liohk-r 
I .aura Aim Honncttc 
Alice Bont* 
Man lion/o 
Katliryn Burdcttc 
Harhara Clayton 
Sara Louise Clarko 
Connie Clarke 
Joan Crawford 
Roberta Crawford 
Catherine Cortes 
Shirley Cox 
I,a\'erne Ualy 
Marjorie Dcas 
Connie Uyc 
Hetty Flake 
Mary Fletcher 
Siiirley Frederick 
Jacquehn Garland 
Connie Hagin 



CALENDAR OF EVENTS 

FRESHMAN CHOIR 

Oct. 24 — Assembly United Nations Day 

Nov. 17 — Assembly Freshmen 

Nov. 18 — Assembly 8th Grade 

Nov. 23 — Assembly Thanksgiving programme 

Dec. II — Christmas Carol programme, Municipal Auditorium 

Dec. 13 — Lenwood Hospital 

Mar. 4 — GASC Convention — Morning session 

Spring Concert and party (date to he announced) 
Operetta Mountain Music (date to be announced) 



Lois Hammond 
Martha Hariirovc 
Bobbie Hasty 
Marian Haygood 
Sylvia Herrington 
Ann Hudson 
\'crmel Jackson 
DenzcHmay Johnston 
Clemmic Mae Kaney 
Judy Lcedham 
Martha Lewis 
Norma Liiuhicum 
Hetty Logan 
Barbara Love 
Mar\- Jane Marbut 
Sylvia Markert 
Constance Marsh 
Shirley Merritt 
Betty Morton 
Myrtle Muns 
Anne Mura 
Kdna Nail 
Shirley Ann Nash 
Patricia Ann NeSmith 
Hetty Neville 
Mary Ann Newcomer 
Shirley Peacock 
( ienic Perkins 
Mary Helen Phillips 



Carolyn Pittman 
Shirley Pitts 
Delores Potcet 
Tovce Powell 
Ruth Powell 
\'irginia Prescott 
Ann Pusey 
Siiirle\' Reese 
Nancy Rivers 
Ann Roberts 
r.ortrude Robertson 
Jac(iuel> n Ron n tree 
Mary Jane Rufo 
Janet Rumbley 
Janice Rnmbley 
Betty Jo Shirley 
Beverly Smith 
Dolores Sox 
r.loria Steinburg 
lune Tanner 
Mabeth Waller 
Betty June Whitaker 
Patricia Wilfong 
F'ay Wilkinson 
Elizabeth Williams 
Joan Wilson 
Jane Wren 
Grace Varbrough 
Naomi Varbrough 



^Metic^ 



ATHLETIC COUN'CIL OFFICERS 

President BETTY LUCKEY 

Vice-President SUZANNE MORRIS 

Secretary KATHLEEN SMITH 

Treasurer MARTHA HEMSTREET 

Point Manager NELLE RUTH GUILL 

Sponsors: Miss Barbara Clark 
Miss Waldccn Roberts 




First Koie: Martha Hcmstrcet, NcIIc Kiith (iui 
Suzanne Morris 



ATHLETIC COL \( M. 

Bt'lt\ Lnckc\. Kathlci-ii Smilli. 



Second Kon 



Connie Tabb. E\el\n Bcckum. Anne Hankinson. Marlba C,ooclwin 



Third lioie: Sue Berr>'. Jnnc Myrick, Benpovan (jcorpc, i^clt\- Clark. Anne Car- 
michael, Florrie Fleming. Slielley Beard 




First Rozv : 



MOST OUTSTANDING, PLAYERS 
Kathleen Smith. Martha (joodwin 



Second liozc: Patricia Swain. Betty Clark. Nan Williams 
Bennett, Rosemar>' Feese, Miss Barbara Clark. Coacli 



VARSITY BASKETBALL TEAM 

Center: Betty Jo Home 

Left to riyht : Kathleen Smith. June Myrick. Suzanne Morris, .\'an- 
cy W'illinpham. Billic je.'ni Unth. Christine Muri)bv. Marion 
Blackstone. Betty Luckey. Betty Bciniett, Betty Jean Fell, Ben- 
v;o\an (Jeorpe. P-'ilti Ann Tarlyn. Anne Carmichael, Florrie 

nemini;. Bctly Clnrk 



Bcttv 




B Var^i+y 



9> 





C Va.rsi+v 






Pm<, Pono-rTcnn'.s CkanDpS 



SWi Grade Rinq Tennis 






ShuffleboardorW Badminto 



FrffsVimao VdIU'i Bail 






Junior 5cftta|l 



5«iior BdAlelball 



Q).0,&Mul 



The D. O. E. dull, sliortcned name for 
the Dau^iitcrs of Entcn^rise. consisls of 
members of the junior and Senior Classes 
enrolled in the Co-operative Training; 
Courses in Distributive Education. The D. 
O. E. Club is affiliated v\ith the Georgia 
Distributive Education Club and the Dis- 
tributive Education Club of America. 



OFFICERS 

I'rcsidcnl PECiCY DURHAM 

/ 'kc-I'rcsidcnt PATSY BLANCH ARD 

Secretary-Treasurer WILLIE LEWIS 

Member of Board of 

Directors BET'1\ Bl.AXCHARl) 



.BETT^■ B1-:XNKTT 




Sealed: Virginia Johnson, Joyce Priest, Erlene Wilk, Betl.v Blanchard, Patsy Blanchard. Man- Alice Blair 

Standing: Martha Crenshaw, Betty Bennett, Lucille Holibs, Peggy Durham, Willie Lewis, Vivi.nn Balkum, Joan Jarred 

Not Pictured — Montine Cliampion, Peggy Grimand, Marjorie Miller, Betty Sorrow, Lois Malcolm, Pauline Ledbetter. Martha Collier 



au^'i 



man 





BRER RABBIT 
SEZ-SEZEE: 

With grateful acknowledgments to 
Brer Rabbit, Uncle Remus, and Joel 
Chandler Harris, I am sure that if 
the little boy had been a little girl. 
she certainly would have run down to 
the cabin to ask Uncle Remus what it 
was that Miss Sally meant when she 
said that we arc often late to appreci- 
ate the finer qualities of certain 
things until they're gone — then it is 
too late. 

"Well now, little miss, dat do be 
true," said Uncle Remus, explaining 
to the little girl, "like Miss Sally sez 
— Wcze pow'ful kerless with the 
Lord's good things but den honey, 
t'aint never too late to recommem- 
ber and say I'se mighty obliged!" 

Therefore with due apologies to 
Uncle Remus, we the Staff of Maids 
and A Man, wish to recall with grati- 
tude our songs and sayings before 
Tubman High School passes as a 
traditional girls' high school. The 



outgoing of Tubman as the tradition- 
al all-girls' high school marks the 
passing of an era in histor>' just as 
Joel Chandler Harris' works marked 
the passing of an era in the history 
of Southern life. 

When one mentions the name of 
Uncle Remus, everyone usually thinks 
of the graciousness of the Old South. 
In that same spontaneous manner, 
when one hears the name. Tubman 
High School, everj'one thinks of a 
high school for the cultured girls of 
Southern charm. Ever since its es- 
tablishment, Tubman has stood for 
the higher education of womanhood. 
Now our girls must say goodbye to 
the cherished traditions and ideals 
that have been a part of Tubman 
for so many years. The best way 
of bidding farewell to our Alma 
Mater is by singing songs of praises 
and of appreciation to a few of those 
outstanding individuals who have 
helped make Tubman what it is to- 
day. With utmost sincerity, we wish 
to recognize and pay tribute to ever>- 



member of the faculty, student body, 
and all others who have furthered 
the interest of Tubman. The follow- 
ing article: "Tubman High School 
Speaks," will acquaint you with the 
progress that has been made through- 
out the years. 

This magazine section, the "Tub- 
man Highlights," is also an outlet 
for the literary- and artistic creations 
of our girls. Who knows but that 
some of these same authors or art- 
ists may become the highlights of to- 
morrow, another sweet singer of the 
South. The literar>' and art commit- 
tees of the Annual have judged all 
contributions on the basis of merit. 
C onyratuldtxons to the contestants 
who have proved their abilities and 
superiority in these fields ! May you 
go forward with the same grace, 
good will, and achievement wherever 
you may be as you have exhibited at 
Tubman and take with you the tra- 
ditions that Tubman High School has 
created. 



"TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 
SPEAKS" 

I am seventy-three years old. What 
would you have done with yourself 
in sc\'cnt>'-thrcc >ears if you were a 
girls' high school like me? Would 
you Iiave made as great a name for 
yourself as 1 have done? I am Tub- 
man High School. Let me tell you 
of m>' hist()r\-. Seventy-three years 
ago, Eniil\ llarvej' Tubman present- 
ed an old building on Reynolds Street 
to the Board of Education. This was 
ihc building in wliich T was to begin 
my career. I was very proud of the 
purpose for wliicli I had been estab- 
lished. After all, wasn't I the first 
girls' high school in Augusta? Until 
my time, people thought hoys were 
llie only ones who could attend 
srluHiI ; so, of course, Kichniond 
Acadi-niy was really surprised when 
1 made my debut into the education- 
al world. For eighteen years I lived 
nil to people's expeiiations of nic. 
In i(;i() a roaring fire destroyed me. 
.ilong with half of downtown Augus- 
t;i, and left me a shamitles. I was 
moved to the First Frcsbytcrian 
(hurcli to await erection of my new 
and preseul building on Walton \\';t\. 
If \o\\\\ seen me a few years later, 
you'd never have recognized me as 
the charred ruin of a short while l)c- 
fore. Once again. I was shiny and 
new and once again my halls echoed 



with laughter of teen-age girls. But 
soon the halls, as well as the class- 
rooms, became too crowded ; and, in 
1929 the wing and lunchroom were 
added. 

Now that >ou know the stor^- of 
Tn\ foundation, let me tell >ou of the 
grand leaders who have guided me 
through many and various difficul- 
ties. First and foremost, I shall men- 
tion Miss Doroth}' Ha ins. our be- 
loved assistant principal. Miss Hains 
kept me in order on Reynolds Street 
and she and Miss Gertrude Comey 
are the only ones here now who were 
present during those early days. The 
various principals I've had are Mr. 
Ben Necly, Mr. John Neely. Mr. T. 
Harry Garrett, and our present prin- 
cipal, Mr. Lamar Woodward, who 
has done much to make nic more 
pleasant for students and facult\. 

Kecentl\, I've iiad a grand repair 
job done to the damage that is a re- 
sult of tliirty-two years of service 
to the yomig girls of Augusta. I was 
given facials, rulnlowns. and they 
e\eu tried out all kinds of colors on 
me, trying to see which did the most 
for mc. 

^'ou should be able to tell b> now 
that I've had a very brilliant past, 
hut it is nothing compared to the 
spectacular future I'm i)latniing for 
myself. 

— Marcia Ansted. 



IN APPRECIATION ! 



WF KFMFMBER 




MLSS MARCIA CLARK 

After twenty-nine years of helpful 
service, one of Tubman's best loved 
teachers has left us. We sincerely 
hope that Miss Marcia Clark will en- 



joy her weli-eamed rest, but we liere 
at Tubman feel that we Iiave indeed 
lost a true friend. It really scares 
us to think about it. How will all 
the future mothers leani to make 
those tiny stitclies wliich are so nec- 
essan.- for baby clothes and which 
she taught so expertly? How will 
career girls ever be able to fashion 
such smart outfits to carry them suc- 
cessfulK' into the business world? 

Miss Clark, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Frank W. Clark, was bom on 
Hecember J3, 1883 at Seneca Falls. 
New York. Ha\ing spent her child- 
liood at Waterloo. New ^'ork. she 
attended the schools there, but she 
later went to the Rochester School 
of TechnoIog\-. Before coming to 
Tulim;in. she had taught three >car-^ 
at \\ inthrop and seven at Florida 
State College for Women. Miss Clark 
has really played a tremendous part 
in training the womanhood of tins 
generation in one of the most use- 
ful and essential of the arts — sew- 
ing. We arc vcr>- flattered and grate- 
ful that she has chosen Augusta as 
her home for so many years. Hun- 
dreds of her former pupils join with 
Tubman in thanking Miss Clark for 
her great contribution to our com- 
munity. 

—Bcttx Bccsoit. 



ifR. LAMAR WOODWARD 
Our Pri7icipal 




When you first came to Tubman, did you wonder who 
that cheerful man was who said hello to you in the 
hall? That man was Mr. Woodward, your principal. 
After you had hecn here for sometime, you became more 
acquainted with him and learned to respect his judgment. 
Mr. Woodward is rcalh- our chief executive, who sees 
that all the wishes of the Board of Education are carried 
out in Tubman. In tuni he takes to them our problems 
and usually hriuKS back favonible results. 

We, the I()50 Annual Staff of Maids and a Man. give 
three cheers to you, Mr. Woodward, for your untirinK 
service to Tubman High School. —l-raiucs I'uiccU. 



"Youk'n hide dc ficr. but zc'at you i/icinc do i^-id dc smoked* 



To be a success in any work, yoii 
must like your joU and enjoy your 
tasks. Perhaps this principle explains 
why Miss A. Dorothy Hains has been 
such a wonderful assistant principal. 
As a real lover of children. Miss 
"Dora" (as she is affectionately called 
by the students and faculty) has 
lielped hundreds of girls through the 
most difficult periods in their lives. 

Coming from a large and close 
family. Miss Doni enjoyed a happy 
childhood, whicli slie recognizes as 
an important factor in her present 
useful, full life. As siie grew to young 
womanhood. M i ss Dora attended 
Tubman like we have, and graduated 
in the class of lScxj. with top honors, 
unlike some of us have. 

When she first came to Tubman as 
a teacher. Miss Dora ground Latin 
into girls. .As time went on, her 
aliility and interest were noticed, and 
she was chosen to serve as assistant 
principal. 

As to hobbies and intcrcfts. Miss 
Dora has a wide variety. She says 
that she loves Tubman girls first and 
foremost. Xext comes her absorbing 
interest in African violets. Among 
other things, Miss Dora likes to sew, 
and is a member of tlic Quota Club. 

We're graduating ibis year, just as 
a class has even.- year. And we might 
forget who William Hlake was. or 
what a certain formula in chemistn,- 
is, or how we go! the Oregon terri- 
tor\-, but we'll never never forget 
Miss Dora Mains and her greeting, 
"What can I do for you. darling?" 

— .'liMuV/t' Banks. 



MISS A. DOROTHY HAINS 

Our .-issistdiit Principiil 




^ 



MISS FLOKKIE FLEMING 
Our T. C. L. President 




^ 



KIXITK KOK A T. C. I,. 
I'KF.SIDEN'T 

(With due apoligies to the Three 
Witches in "Macl>e!h") 
l^t'diiiitcd to I'lorric Fleming 
First Witch : 

"Twice the Tubman School bell 
ringed." 
Second Witch : 

"Twice' and once the 'I*. A.' 
whined." 
Third Witch: 

"Minerva cries. 'Tis time,* tis 

niue." 
(that is, a quarter til) 
First Witch : 

"Kound about the caldron go; 
In the personality throw. 
Knergy for everyone 
Days and nights, all thirty-one. 
Consideration fairh- got , 
Hoil thou first i' the charmed 
pot." 
All: 

"Double, double, joy and juggle; 
Fire bum and caldron bubble." 
Second Witch : 

"One long ton of Tubman spirit. 
In the caldron boil and stir it. 
Pint of brain-juice, pound of 

sports. 
Peck of speeches, four A's on 

reports. 
Quart of work, and service long. 
Happy looks and blithesome song. 
For a charm of leader's sway. 
This is Florric's everv wav. 



AH: 



"Double, double, joy and juggle. 
Fire bum and caldron bubble." 



MISS BALK 

For yeais the office mechanism of 
Tubman High School has 1 een nni 
smoothly with few. if any. interrupt- 
ions. Bells have rung, classes changed, 
students entered, students withdniwn, 
classes graduated in unending con- 
tinuance. VN'Iien matters proceed with 
no trouble, we are apt to overlook 
the person or persons responsible for 
the excellent order. For example, 
have you ever wondered who carries 
on the school's correspondence. wh<. 
fixes the daily menu, who handles all 
business matters in the office, who 
sees that ln-lls are rung promptly. wh<. 
communicates with colleges for in 
formation, and performs dozens ot 
other tasks tliat are necessary tn 
smooth operation? The person whc 
docs all these and numerous other 
things spends most of her lime be 
hind her desk in Miss Dora's office, 
busily al>sorbed in Iter duties. Miss 
L>ora calls her "Mar\", the majority 
of the student body know her as 
"Miss Balk", and her real title is 
"efficiency expert". 

Keeping a school going is quite a 
job, but Miss Balk doesn't stop at 
mere routine work. If you ever go to 
the office feeling kind of sick but not 
exactly hurting, you can expect Miss 
!Balk to understand thai you really 
need to go home. Or if the teacher 
bas been cross and made you cr\-, you 
know Miss Balk will tr\ to cheer you 
up before you tell Miss Dora all 
about il. When there's someone 
around who will laugh and under- 



MISS MAKV BALK 
Our Seeretarv 




stand, life al Tulnnaii i.- .-a niLiL I 
easier to bear. 

Many years have elapsed and Mis- 
Mar> Balk lias served Tubman long 
and faithfulK. In all tht- years to 
come. ma\ she continue to work, 
laugh, and s.vmpathize with the stu- 
dents of Tubman. We, the class of 
1050. pay tribute to Miss Mar> Balk 
as the person who keeps Tubman 
going. 

— Marjorie Jetintiujs. 



FIRST PLACE FAMILIAR ESSAY 

THE MEANING OF BEING A TUBMAN SENIOR 



Four years ago I crept like a wee 
mouse into the tremendous building 
called Tubman. Freshmen, who were 
looked down upon by the "high and 
migiit\'" seniors, were last in the 
lunch line and had to stand during 
auditorium programs. Now the 
seniors have no more privileges than 
an eighth grader. Seniors are last in 
the lunch line; seniors are "mobbed" 
in the halls; seniors have few lock- 
ers ; and seniors are accredited with 
all the mischief that spreads through- 
out the school. Tliese are onl\' the dis- 
advantages, but now they seem un- 
important to me. 

Being a senior also has its advan- 
tages. Even though seniors liave no 



prerogatives, they are respected and 
considered as examples by the rest 
of the student body. A senior is 
usualh' more popular than a girl from 
a lower grade. Seniors have the most 
responsible jobs in Tubman — presi- 
of the T. C. L., Secretary, or Patrol 
Captain, presidents of various clubs 
as well as editors of the newspaper 
and annual. Although some of us 
haven't realized it yet, we are living 
the happiest year of our lives. For 
some girls, their senior year means 
dates, football games on Friday 
nights, and lots of fun. To others, 
the senior year means more respon- 
sibilities, less time for recreation, and 
more studying. For four years we have 



been storing away knowledge as a 
squirrel stores away nuts. We have 
also stored away something finer — 
many friends. We have known some 
of these friends since our freshman 
year. In our senior year we become 
better acquainted with our teachers 
and realize that when they assigned 
many pages of homework, it was for 
our own good. 

Now when thoughts of graduation 
enter my mind. I don't have the same 
feeling that I anticipated in my fresh- 
man days. I don't feel happy at all. Is 
this strange? A senior who does not 
look forward to her graduation da\" 
is indeed strange. What does gradu- 
ation mean to me? Graduation means 



the height of accomplishment toward 
which I have striven for four years. 
Graduation also means saying 
"adieux" to the many good times I've 
had at Tubman and my faithful 
friends. On graduation day, Tm sure 
that I shall see many tear- filled eyes 
because "parting is such sweet sor- 
row." Some of my classmates will 
go to college; some will seek their 
fortunes in the business world : others 
I may never see again. In such sad 
times, there is always one light of 
hope. I can still keep my memories of 
my happy high school days, and look 
forward to more days of friendship in 
college. 

—Martha Dye. 



FIRST PLACE HUMOROUS ESSAY 

MV LITTLE BROTHER 



An old school friend of Mother's 
pops up occasionally, as such things 
do; and, amid the babbling discuss- 
ion of "the good olc days", their res- 
respective families, Mrs. So-and- 
So's new hat. and whatever happened 
to Suzie Snodgrass. the simpering 
idiot always discovers and raves 
about tliat unl)carablc little monster — 
my mother's jo\", m\' father's pride. 
and my Waterloo — my kid brother. I 
.say "di.scovers" — only a figure of 
speech in this instance. He makes 
himself known as definitely as a case 
of measles. The misguided imbecile 
loves liim, she thinks his hair's so 
pretty, she's bowled over by his 
cleverness, she gushes baby talk to 
him. If that goon only knew what ex- 
cniiating pain the grinning imp causes 
me, her blood would rim cold. Lest 
you think me unjustly harsh or cruel, 
permit me to cite you a few examples, 

In girls of my age there is always 
some gigantic secret, some over- 
whelming passion, some unreasonable 
emotion that is utterly inexpressible 
in everyday circumstances. To avoid 
exploding b\' keeping tlie Unutterable 
in. girls confide in someone, usualh 
anotlier girl who is tried and true. 
I'm entirely too uiu-ommunlcativc for 
anything of this sort. Instead I made 
the mistake of keeping a diary. In 
that little book went all my hopes, 
ambitions, fears, joys — everything. 1 
guarded it with my life from HIM, 
luit it was no use. Everywhere I put 
it, he found it five mimites later. No 
nook or craiui\' was oliscure enough 
to hide It from his prying eyes. He 
has a genius for finding things. I 
think he plans to replace J. Edgar 
Hoover when lie's older. Getting 
back to the diary, imagine my horror 
when, on entering the dining room. 1 
heard my secret hni- beliii; carelessl> 
discussed over the table by the family. 
I know then that HE has found it 
again, and absorbed everv new en- 
try. He practically runs an t-slablish- 
ment for telling the neighbors any- 
thing they care to know about the 
Life and Loves of Marjorie Jennings. 
I expect any day now to open the 
newspaper and see my secret con- 
fessions bared to the pulilic eyes, in 
three-inch letters, and edited by that 
lovable creature, niv little brotlier. 



Needless to say, I discontinued my 
diar\-. 

I sit anxiously by the telephone 
all afternoon, straining my ears for 
the least little tinkle. The reason? 
I anticipate a drooly deal with a 
lucious lad. As I interrupt my vigil 
for five seconds in order to eat, the 
phone rings. I dash madly away, up- 
setting table, chair, plate, and any- 
thing that happens to be in my path 
in the wild dash for the phone. I 
expect the worse. Yes. Too late. 
HE'S already there. "Hello." a sweet 
voice coos. I stand glued to the floor. 
I know what he'll do ; it's happened 
before. I listen horrorstricken as he 
continues. 

"Mawgie? Naw. She ain't here 
now. Whatcha want? A what? Naw, 
she never has them." 

An interested gurgle from the other 
end of the line. 

"Well, I know she won't but I'll 
tell 'er . Bye." 

Don't call it mischievousness. No 
ordinar\' child could be that malicious 
Don't call it ignorance. W^ell does 
he know how I've waited for that 
call. Equally well does he know how 
my future depended on It. I'm forced 
to sit home on Saturday night. After 
I've beaten him half to death (he's 
considerably smaller than I), he fi- 
nally gets the idea that he's not to 
tell the nice boys fibs. 

In illustrating the difference be- 
tween the words vision and sight, 
someone once quipped, "When a 
woman goes to bed, slie's a vision. 
W'hcn she gets up, she's a sight." I 
am no exception to the general rule. 
In fact. I'm not ever a vision, but 
(|uite often I'm a sight, especially 
in the moniing. The Fiend takes ad- 
vantage of this principle. One par- 
ticularly horrible morning, 1 had just 
risen and was making an anxious in- 
spection of my battered coinitenance. 
Dressed In baggy over-sized pajamas. 
my hair In curlers, some j.:hastly mess 
plastered on m\ face, an<l generally 
at my worst. 1 was something to be- 
hold. Suddenly I heard someone yell 
at the top of his voice, "Fi-yah." Of 
course I ran out the door, fell down 
tlie steps; and staggered across the 
yard, I saw HIM. Clutched in his 
little paw was a camera. Before I 



could run, hide, or crawl behind 
something, he took the picture. Now 
I obey his ever\- command. To do 
otherwise would be disastrous, for 
the picture turned out beautifully. 

When the birds sing, the flowers 
flow, and spring has sprung, a young 
lady's fancy turns to young men. 
Turns? My mistake. It's been there. 
Anyhow, when m\- Big Moment came 
to call, I was all adither. As we sat 
in the moonlight, breathing the rose- 
perfumed air. and watching the stars 
stare, the three of us had a lovely 
time. My little brother, bless his 
bones, educated him and me along all 
lines, including fish, worms, marbles, 
baseball, firecrackers, "frawgs". and 
numerous other fascinating subjects. 
How can a family get along without 
such a versatile genius? But for him, 
I might have grown up in ignorance. 
Of course, HE accompanied us every- 
where we went, and stuck even,- 
minute until he left, even going to 
the door with us and bidding the 
furious \oung man a polite good- 
night only after I'd gone into the 
house and closed the door. Have you 
ever had murder in your heart? 

By some peculiar (pi irk, I have 
travel in my blood. It's a wonder 
I have anything in it. except water, 
after thirteen years with that Plague. 
Nevertheless, when anyone says 
"Go?". I say "When ?". The urge 
for going must come from mv desire 
to escape. Correspondingly. HE nips 
in the bud my ever>- attempt. Why 
<lo I obey him ? Useless question. 
With all the detrimental information 
he holds, it'd be like signiiig m\ own 
deatli warrant not to. On one occa- 
sion, I wanted desperately to spend 
the week-end \\ ith a friend. After 
many whispered conferences, we had 
completed plans for a wonderful time. 
Foolish optimism. I knew what 1 
must do. The obicct was to pet 
home, secure paternal permission, 
pack my few rags, and get out. 
Sounds simple? Ha! If you only 
knew, he's always away in the 
afternoons, to avoid having to study. 
Seeing my advantage. I make use of 
it. I lounge nonchalantly until he 
leaves, then whirl into feverish ac- 
tion. After r\e gathered m\ posses- 
sions. I'm ready to go. With shoes 



in hand, I sneak toward the door. Ai 
that fateful moment. HE chooses to 
come in for a gun. ball, or somethijig 
— goodness knows what — and I find 
myself staring straight into his chub- 
by angelic face. Desperately, I hide 
the suitcase under my coat. With a 
sickly attempt at casualness. I mum- 
ble something about the weather; but 
he's too quick for the likes of me. 
Observing the bulge under my coat, 
lie remarks, 

"Puttin' on a little weight, aincha?" 
I know when I'm licked. As I fall 
exhausted on the floor, I manage to 
mutter "Sweet child." 

From all these demonically clever 
plots of his. you arrive at the con- 
clusion that he's clever. Even I must 
admit that. Mother, Daddy, the 
neighbors, the relatives, and practic- 
ally everyone who knows him thinks 
he's nothing short of a genius. "But," 
I ask myself, "How can he be in- 
telligent and do some of the things 
he does?" For example, when he 
hears a song that tickles his fancy, 
he sings it continually. This isn't 
quite so bad as some of the things 
he docs, if he would only Jiiii/ all of 
the song and not just one line. Once, 
when he loved a little number called 
"The Maharajah of Matador", he un- 
fortunately only remembered the first 
line of the chonis. As the agonized 
"Ah-ah. ah-ah-ah-ah" rang out, the 
neighbors for several blocks around 
were petrified. They thought his sins 
liad finally caught up with him. In 
a frenzy of terror (for he's a 
favorite in the neighborhocKl). they 
phoned the police and reported that 
we were beating (hat lovely child witli 
a niM>er hose or something, and they 
ought to /ireir him scream. In spile 
of all we could do or say. Daddy had 
to spend the night in jail. 

Now you understand, don't you? 
Should you sec a young girl with the 
face of an old. old woman making 
her way feebly down the street, don't 
be alarmed. It's me. When you arc 
ovenvhelmed by your troubles, think 
of me, surrounded by him. Aren't 
children a joy? Isn't my little brother 
in particular a great blessing? The 
advertisement of the gypsy fortune 
teller summarizes him perfectly — 
"Sees all. knows all, tt'lls all." 

— Hy Marjorie Jennings 



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A MODERN FAIRY TALE 

Once there was a younp school 
teacher who lived in an old board- 
ing house. She taught at a high school 
a few blocks away. One afternoon, at 
the end of a ven- hard day. she was 
sitting all alone in her school room. 
Suddenly a tiny fairy flew in the 
door. 

"Why did T ever decide to teach 
school?" sighed the teaciier. "If onlv 
I could be anything I wish to be !" 

"All right," said the fair>'. "Your 
wish is granted !'* And slie disappear- 
ed. 

The teacher picked up her papers 
and went home. All the wa.\', slic 
thought about what she would wish 
to he. As she crossed tiie street, deep 
in thought, she heard a loud, screech- 
ing honk. She made the four feet to 
the sidewalk in one jump as a long, 
black car roared by. doing about <J3. 
The teacher became slightly annoyed. 
On tile ne.xt block she passed a de- 
partment store. As she was in front 
of the door, she saw a man inside 
hanging up a "Bargain Sale" sign. 
The next thing she heard was the 
sound of a rushing waterfall, or was 
it? N*o, the next second she was 
smothered beneath millions of pound- 
ing feet. After about a half hour tlie 
dust cleared away and. thougli slight- 
ly deafened by the screams from in- 
side the .-itore. she picked herself up 
and continued on her way — a little 
more annoyed. 

She reached her boarding house 
and began climbing the stairs to her 
room. Halfway up. she slipped on a 
roller skate. She began climbing 
again, avoiding the broken places in 
the stair caused by her fall. She en- 
tered the room, sat down on the I cd. 
and took off her shoes. She noticed 
a run in her stocking — half an inch 
wide! She suddenly felt ;rry annoy- 
ed. In a ntge she threw her shoe at 
the moody, yellow -green canary in 
the tarnished cage in the comer. 

"Why do / have to go through all 
this?" she screamed. 

The wind outside swelled to match 
her voice, and the falling leaves 
sounded like rain in the darkness. 

She looked angrily at the canan.' 
"^'ou haven't an\" worries. I wish I 
were you," she said. 

Suddenly she remembered about 
the fain,'. "O no I", she cried. "I 
didn't me-in that. Of course I'd rather 
be what I am than a broken-down 
canarv in an old cage. I take it all 
back !" 

She waited tenseh' for a few min- 
utes, hut when it became apparent 
that she was not changing, she re- 
laxed. 

The wind roared louder and 
louder. It rushed around the cornef; 
of the house, and surged down the 
chimney and around the room. The 
decrepit boarding house roof gave 
way, and the whole building gently 
collapsed. 

The wind itself retreated in horror 
from the scene. The only thing thai 
moved in Mie pile of rubble was the 
yellow-green c?nary. who had not re- 
ceived a scratch. 

— Ann Bicdcrman. 



A GRADUATION' POEM 
Martha Dye 
In June on graduation day 
I'm sure that I shall see 
Many seniors not too gay 
Who would young freshmen like 
to be. 

* 
SEXIOR YEAR 
By Barbara Glass 

Off the bus 
And through the gate. 
Looked at the building 
And thought of my fate. 

L'p the walk. 

Into the door. 

Started to talk 

For a minute or more. 

Into tile room. 

Sat in a chair 

It wasn't my doom 

The school was fair! 

The teacher was nice. 
.\s sweet as could he. 
Tried to talk, no dice 
She lectured me. 

Then I realized 
School is for learning 
Got out my visualized 
For me it was yearning. 

Now I'm a Senior 
A big girl now. 
Do I feel good? 
Do I ? And how ! 



MINERVA 
By I'irgima Tou'ilt 

Minerva, our goddess, stands oh so 

erect ; 
I'pon her we gaze with due respect. 
For four long years 
We've used both eyes and ears. 
And it really keeps us on our toes. 
Tr>ing to learn all that Minerva 

knows. 
Sometimes she casts knowing looks, 
At us stniggling with our books. 
"Please", we cr> "there must be an 

easier way," 
But to all our pleas she replies, 

"Nay". 
We entered Tubman fresh as a daisy. 
But heavens, we must have been 

crazy I 
We must tr\' so hard to please. 
Why, we can't even walk the halls in 

three.*;. 
But it's not all work and no fun 
I f you know how to get all these 

things done. 



BUT ONE DAY MORE 
By Hnslyu Botjcslov 

If my life's span were but one day 
more. 

Two sounds I'd like to hear; 
A robin's song, an ocean's roar. 

To help mc calm my fear. 

If I had but one day more to fill. 

Two things I'd like to see; 
A sunset and a daffodil. 

Before Death captures me. 



FOOTSTEPS IX THE DARK 

My grandfather's house is a big. 
gray, building with a tower and many 
secret doors and passage ways. It is 
almost hidden from the street by 
giant oaks, and at night in the moon- 
light, it looks as if it would be an 
ideal haunt for a ghost or two. 

My bedroom is on the first floor 
next to my grandfather's and is often 
called the "gold fish bow!" because of 
its many windows whicli reach almost 
to the floor. These windows open on 
the front veranda that extends half 
way around the house. Many an after- 
noon we have sat on this porch in the 
cool of the evening and watched the 
sun set. 

The night I am going to tell about 
was moonlit, hot. and still. As I 
tossed in bed, I heard footsteps com- 
ing up the stone walk toward the 
house. They crept quickly up the 
steps and stopped in front of the 
door. 1 kept as still as a mouse. 
Then they turned and came slowly to- 
ward my room. My heart started 
pounding so fast and furiously that 
I was sure it could be heard. To my 
surprise, when the footsteps passed 
beneath my windows. I didn't see any- 
thing ! Mysten. filled the air. I <lared 
not even breathe when they paused 
in front of a rocking chair which 
suddenly began to rock, back and 
forth, hack and forth. There, outside 
my window. I stared transfixed at 
the chair, rocking, with no visible 
form in it. I lay in bed not moving a 
muscle and hoping with all my might 
who ever it was woidd go away. A 
mournful tniin whistle was heard in 
the distance. Then the incessant rock- 
ing stopped. My heart stopped too. 
For a moment all was (piiet until — 
Bang !— Bang ! two shots were fired. 
I thought surely it was at mc that 
gun had been aimed. Wet with per- 
spiration and cold with fright. I 
closed mv eves and praved for dav- 
light. 

It is strange what tricks your 
imagination will play on you on a 
hot summer night. For as soon as 
I opened my eyes. I found that I was 
much alive anil the shots that I had 
heard were simply two shades that 
had nm up. When I went out on the 
porch to investigate the mysterious 
footsteps, there sleeping peacefully in 
the rocker was "Bo", the little puppy 
who lived next door. 

— florric f'li'niint/. 



CONVENIENCE 
By Joyce C. Smith 
I asked you nothing hut your love. 
In return for mine. 
I thought that you would let mv 

know 
By some affection sign. 

^'ou've shown me not the least of 

ways 
In which you ever cared. 
But I have dreamed a thousand 

dreams. 
In which our love was shared. 

You tried in every simple way 
To say it couldn't be. 
And in my heart I knew you'd pray 
To keep from hurting me. 



MEDITATION 

By Pat Marhut 

I'd rather be a monkey 
Hanging by my knees. 
I'd rather be a hoot owl 
Sitting in the trees. 

I'd ratlier be an empty box 
Lying on the shelf. 
I'd rather be most anything 
Than just my own true self! 

Why can't I he two people? — 
It would really make me glad. 
And when I'm tired of being good. 
Why then. Pd just be bad ! 

If two arc easy, why not three? 
A sweet, a smart, a pretty — 
For rarely arc they all three found 
On one girl — morc's the pity. 

I really can't go on this way — 
I've nothing left to say. 
You'd do me quite a favor 
If you'd just throw this away. 

But if you took me at my word 
And did what I have hinted, 
I'd defeat my only purpose — 
I'd not get this tiling printed. 



MEMORIES 
By Gloria I'hilli/>s 
Looking hack across the years, 
I see a girl scared to tears. 
A school before her — halls unknown — 
^'ears of service it has shown. 

I see a girl frightened dumb 
As though to some strange world 

she's come. 
I-rtshman, green, you belter cram. 
^'ou*re about to fail your first exam. 

The worst is over; the fight is won. 
^'our Sophomore year is just begun. 
So soon your junior year arrives 
With gym, geometry and jives. 

I see a girl — no more a tear 
Of fright she sheds— A Senior, dear! 
Who is this girl? Tell me true. 
Why, Senior, dear, this girl is you. 



THK LONE CHIMNEY 
By Connie Havird 

How oft along the wayside, I have 

seen thee stately stand : 
Like a knight in shining armor, who 

hath withstood the raw foe's 

hand. 
All from thee hath been taken, thy 

love, thy joy, thy peace, 
The little children's gatherings, and 

the often popcorn feasts. 
Thy food hath bien dejvrived thee; 

thou hast grown w:iu and weak. 
The fire hath devoured thy shelter, 

and the winds against thee beat. 
Still thou hast in'dden (h\ sorrows in 

the deep walls ()(" ih\ heart, 
And there thou hast held them 

steadfast, ne'er to depart. 
Thy braver>' and faith is unbeaten; 

a knight thou truly art. 
No more a lonely rhimnev. luil a 

Comfort tf> the saddened heart. 



HIGH STANDARDS OF 
F ACHIEVEMENT IN YOUTH 
SHOULD BE OUR AIM 

While we are young, we should 
work "to get ahead" rather than to be 
satisfied with just "passing." If we 
take that attitude during school years, 
we are destined to have great achieve- 
ments throughout our life. This is the 
"Atomic Age" in which we are rapid- 
ly progressing. We must adapt our- 
selves to the many changes. If we 
have low standards of achievement, 
we cannot readily do this. 

How have many outstanding persons 
become great? Surely, they were not 
born to the position which they have 
obtained. Most of them worked their 
way up with an increasing desire "to 
get ahead." 

How have scientists contributed so 
much to civilization? If it were not 
for their intellectual ability and years 
, of hard work, we would not have 
many of our modern conveniences 
which we enjoy. They were not inac- 
tive, but they had an urge to im- 
prove and to invent things for our 
benefit and comfort. 

Therefore, I truly believe that all of 

us should strive for high standards 

of achievement in our youth so that 

we can live a better life in the future. 

— Jane Hcng. 



THE FLITURE 

By Marilyn Taiiciibaiim 

I look into the future 
And I sec a land of smiles. 
I can sec laughing cliildren, 
For many, many miles. 

They play and dance together, 
And never turn their face 
To sec if someone will stop them, 
Because of creed, color, or race. 

Oh I hope this land of the future 

Is very, very near, 

So children can pla_\' like these I 

speak of, 
Without ever having a fear. 

I can feel it in my heart 
That we're not far from this. 
This beautiful land of sunshine 
This land of happiness. 



ODK TO I.ATIN 

( Ap()h)piis lu l\. L. S.) 

.inn Hicdcnmin 

I have a Latin teacher 
Who goes in and out with me. 
And every little long mark 
."^he always seems to see. 

1 j.;o with lesson all prepared 

And all my hopes are hi^ih 

The teaclier says "Translate" and nu- 

She always passes by. 

But if, perchance, I come to cla;>s 
With lessons still undone. 
She seeks mc out and asks to me 
The questions, even," one. 

And so I always come to class 
With lesson done witli care 
And as far as teacher is concerned 
I'm the Man Who Wasn't there! 



ABSENT-MINDED 

While sitting in my one. lone study 
hall that comes and goes so quickly 
each week. I decided to find out my 
Algebra assignment. I was in the 
process of getting it from my friend, 
Carolyn. 

Oh, I really must stop and tell you 
about Carolyn. She is a character! 
Not bad, but oh so witty. You should 
have heard her in Science Class try- 
ing to say "thermometer." It went 
something like this, thermo, thermo, 
thermo, oh goodness, thermometer! 
We all got really tickled at that one. 
But as I was saying, did you see that 
lovely coat in the store on the corner 
of Eighth and Broad, or was it 
Seventh Avenue ? Well, I saw it 
Tuesday, now maybe it was Wednes- 
day. Monday was my dentist appoint- 
ment and Tuesday my club meeting 
and Wednesday was my music lesson, 
hmmm. ma\be I saw that coat in a 
fashion magazine. 

But to go on about the dentist — 
he pried and scraped, pulled and jerk- 
ed around my teeth until I knew I 
was going to scream. He took down 
a big contraption to clean them (so 
he said) but I think it must have been 
one of those contraptions that be- 
headed King Charles, or was it King 
James? 

My, my, I'm getting so absent- 
minded ! But I'll start at the begin- 
ning all over again. Oh dear, there 
goes the bell ! I really must run. But 
please drop over sometimes and let 
me tell you all about my trip to New 
Orleans, or was it Texas? 

— Shirley Reese. 



TUBMAN HIGH SCHOOL 
By Mareia Levy 

T is for the talent, hidden within our 
walls; 

U is for understanding of one 
another by all ; 

B is for the best, for our girls \\c 
make this claim ; 

M is for one man. Mr. Woodward 
is his name ; 

A is for alertness, practiced by stu- 
dents, faculty and all the 
rest ; 

N is for ne-:\.'s. of Tubman girls you 
always hear the liest. 

il is for the heifiht of success — which 
many of our girls attain; 

I is for intellii/enee. here once 

actiuired. always remains; 
(i is for !/iiiid sportsmansliip. whjcli 
w I' always try to sliow ; 

II is lur liii/h linncrs we holt.! in \\a\s 

that man\ don't know. 

S is for siniplieify ; we arc unt \er\" 

elalmrale: 
(' is I'or class eonneils and iiniven- 

tinns to which we alwa>s 

send delegates ; 
11 is for lii>nesly which we try to keep 

amont; our girls : 
(> is f(ir tunens of good will — T.H.S. 

has the best in the world; 
O leaves me only one thing to say: 
L you're luelcy if you're a Tubman 

praduate on your graduation 

dav. 



I WAS TEACHER FOR ONE DAY 

Upon my arrival home from col- 
lege where I had completed my 
course in "teaching", I found a letter 
awaiting me. After reading the con- 
tents of the letter, I began to ap- 
proach my mother on the subject of 
the offer. You see, m^- mother had 
an idea she wanted me to stay home 
for at least a year before going to 
work. I explained the teaching po- 
sition to her. The position was in a 
small town in Arkansas. Tlie teacher 
had had a nervous break-down and 
she must be replaced. Since I was 
mentioned as a good teacher by the 
college. I was offered the position. 

On September 2, I found myself 
aboard a train bound for Arkansas. 
At Little Rock, I had to change 
trains. When I saw the train I was 
to ride on, I nearK' passed out. It 
must have been made in 1903, I know. 
After one hour of the train, I was 
ver>- irritated, but when a huge wo- 
man got on, and with her eleven 
children, I was desperate. Her child- 
ren, ranging in age from four months 
to fourteen years, w-ere the most un- 
ruly children I had ever seen. 

One small boy had a jar of ants 
and of course the bottle had to break. 
Then an ant bit the baby and with 
the baby and boy crying at the same 
time it was terrific. .A.fter the worst 
train ride I have ever experienced. I 
arrived at the small town — "Hen- 
peck." I stepped down from the train 
and stopped to get my bearings. The 
town was made up of one unpaved 
street, a general store, a liver>- stable, 
church and the small station. There 
was one ancient automobile. \\ hicli 
served as a taxi and a deliver}' truck. 
The driver informed me that I could 
rent a room at "Maw's Boarding 
House", which was about six miles 
north of town. 

We had gone about a mile when we 
stopped in front of a frame house. 
There were several children running 
around the house, chickens scratch- 
ing in the dirt, and a cow grazing in 
the front yard. I was told by the 
driver that this was farmer O'Toole's 
house, and he had to deliver some 
food. After he struggled with the 
sack for five minutes, he finalK" got 
it to the barn. One hour later he re- 
turned and so we resumed our journ- 
ey. 

Approximately one mile later he 
liad to stop by Miss Gwendolyn's 
house to give her a cure for her sick 
hog. After losing tliirty or more 
minutes, we again started out. 

,*V tire blew out two and a iialf 
miles down the road, and so 1 sat 
another hour while it was being 
fixed. Four hours after I left the 
station, I arri\cd at m\ now desti- 
nation — "Maw 's Board ini: House." I 
went immediately to my room and 
settled down for a good nap and 
much needed rest after such an or- 
deal As I am allergic to feathers, 
naturally there was an old-fashioned 
feather mattress on my bed. After a 
sleepless ni>:lit, scratching, etc., 1 was 
reminded that it was dawn by the 
melodious crow of a baritone rooster, 
and suddenly realized tins was my 
first day as the new school mami, as 
I was referred to. On preparing my 
usual toilet, I went in for break- 
fast. After going tlirouph the 
motion of a very hearty breakfast, 
one you would expect a woodcutter 
to sit down to. I inquired as to where 
the school buildini; was. Maw. as we 
all called her. replied. "Just a short 
spell down the road." This short spell 
turned out to be between two and 



three miles. I started out in the direc- 
tion I was instructed and after cov- 
ering the distance, I arrived at the 
school house. The school house was 
a small unpainted structure made of 
rough lumber, which consisted of one 
room, twelve desks and a large table 
at the front of the room which I used 
for my desk. My first pupils began to 
arrive — Oh ! My gosh ! The first was 
a red-haired, freckled-faced, buck- 
tooth little boy; next came his sister 
who had red curls and a darling 
smile. They were known as "Freck" 
and "Dimp." Then second came two 
brothers wiiose names were "Uther 
and Tuther". They were the meanest 
brats in the class. 

After all my twelve students had 
arrived and had been seated, I be- 
gan the lessons. During Math, Tuther 
put ink on Dimp's curls. After that 
was straightened out, Tuther put a 
rat down Lucy Mae's dress and you 
should have heard all the squealing! 
To top that off Freck threw a to- 
mato at Tuther, but Tuther ducked — 
it hit me squarely in the face. 

Well, that did it. I was disgusted at 
first, but now I was furious. Today 
I am secretary for a lawyer in New- 
York City and I hope I never see 
another school again. 

—Betty Neville. 



THE GOLDEN PALOMINO 
By Rosemary fecsc 

A king or ruler against the sky 
.All power but his he will deny. 
Stately there lie stands his rule. 
Without a sword he'll fight his duel. 

But, alas! Here comes a challenge. 
Another horse wants his reign 
As king of the hills and mountains. 
As king of the rocks and plains. 

The other horse as black as coal 
Has set his head for the ruling goal. 
He flings his head but now stands 

straight, 
Halting a moment to show his hate. 

Then forward charging with all his 

might 
He tries to win his perilous fight. 
To win the kingdom from his foe. 
To rule the strays for evermore. 

So, charging ficrcel\. they fii:ht for 

the cause. 
To win or else to lose their all. 
The experience of the j^olden horse 
Against youth and miglit and 

uncanny force. 

They fight until the challenger flees 
With shattered pride as cast of war. 
The iiolden ralomino reigns — still 
Kiu).: of horses near and far. 



A SKNiOK'S LIFE 
By Pat Marbut 
Running from meeting to meeting 
With classes in between ; 
Setting a i;ood example 
Letting ourselves be seen 
Book in hand, note liook in other 
(Pencil nowhere near) 
Trackini: down a reference to 
The War of Jenkins' Ear; 
We Seniors snalcii the spotlight. 
But we'll give it back next year — 
'Cause we'll be stuck in the same old 

place 
Right back where wc have been. — 
Farewell to all our greatness 
For we'll be Freshmen again. 




First roiv: I. Billie Jean Kiuh, -;. S;ira Galloway. 3. Carolyn l.uli.iuk-, ^|. lA.ri.iii> Wren, 5. Jc-annettc Gay, 6. Jane Rajisdale, 
7. Barbara Allen. 

Second rou'-. 8. Estelle Rcsopolos. 0. Barbara Culpepper. 10. Gloria Phillips. 11. Florric Fleminp. 12. Mollic Burdcll. 1,^. Betty 
and ^fary Liickcy. 14. -Ada Bradley. 15. Elizalietli Erickson. 16. Vivian Balkcnm. 17. Barbara Ginilcr, 19. Elsie Ann W'illit;e, 
20. Dorothy Beeland 21. Miss Marshall. 22. Annette Harper, 2^. Ilclen Foster. J4. Edna Mcintosh. 

Third ro-M: 25. Miss Hulbert. 26. Miss Byrd. 27. Miss McAuliffe. 28. Miss Braddy, 20. Miss Wilkinson. 

I-ourlh roiv: 30. Miss Roberts, 31. Miss Moore, 32. Sister and Mi ss Boatwright, a. Miss Gilliland 34. Miss Johnson, 35- i'iss 
Carswell. 




Scrinid fiiX'.': .*<. M:irv l,m'kc\-. i>. Janice I£\crctt, io. (jloria Johnson. II. Bcvcrl\ McMicliad and brother, IJ. Carol S\inms, 
i.i. Carolui BulUr, i i. Helen Foster. 

Thircl lull': 15. Barliara McLean, id. Koslyn BorcsIov, 17. First Grade Monte Sano, 18. Sally Xixon, ly. Miss Hart. 

I'lXirlh row. 20. Patsy Campbell ami brollier. Ji. Lois Dozicr. -'-'. Martha Dye, 23. Betty Noryell. 

bijili iriTi-: .'.|. .Mrs. Siv:niaii. -'J. Cimnie Satchcr, 26. Gaines and Jane Hupuley. 27. Jean Bewick. 

Sixlli iMic: 28. Mary Jo Wood, 20. Harriettc Perkins, .to. Jean Creech, ji. La \cnK Bridges, .12. C.wynne Odum. .t.i. Belly 
Blanchard, 34, Sally and Elcanora Nixon, Anne and Pete Carmichael. 



^aU ^ii( and 



We, the last Senior Class of Tubman High School. 
1950, being in a devastated physical condition and an 
utterly unbelievable mental one, do hereby declare and 
publish this as our last will and testament: 

ITEM 1 : I, Margie Thompson, do hereby will and be- 
queath the nerve-wracking bus rides to and from 
Camp Gordon to any army brat who can stand 
them. 

ITEM 2 : I. Gloria Phillips, do hereby leave to Joanne 
Harbin the great honor of going to summer .«chool 
every year. I sincerel.v hope that she will get as 
much enjoyment out of it as I did. 

ITEM 3: We, Jeanine IMays and Joanne Ford, do will 
and bequeath to Betty Jean Matthews and Jean 
Smallwood our ability to change typewriters three 
times a week and still pass our timed writings. 

ITEM 4: We, Jane Hugulcv, Jackie Shipman, Austin 
Giilidand. Betty Jo Home, Kitty Sibley, Mary Jo 
Wood, and MoUie Burdell, do leave to all lucky 
Juniors our ability to cut during the movies and 
always have an e.xcuse when caught. 

ITEJI 5: I, Mar.jorie Jennings, do will and bequeath 
to Anne Hoover the dotage and good will of all 
the Tubman teachers (it'll carry you far). 

ITEM 6 : We, Sondra William.-- and Johnnie Wombles, 
do will and bequeath to Shirley Williams our per- 
fect brains and flawless handwriting in order that 
she may be as good a bookkeeper as we. 

ITEM 7: I, Carolyn Kenned.v, do will and bequeath to 
Christine Murphy my American Hi.-tory book, hop- 
ing that she enjcys looking at the pictures as much 
as I did. 

ITEM 8: I, Betty Jo Home, do will and bequeath to 
Suzanne Morris my "A" model in hope.-' she will 
develop her basketball muscles by pushing it. 

ITEM 9: We. Betty Helmly and Betty Lott, do will 
and bequeath to Barbara Lang and Madeline Fer.st 
our ability to eat candy while working in the Snack 
Bar when Mrs. Turner's back is turned. 

ITEM 10: I, Jewell Bentley, do will and bequeath to 
Judy McLaughlin my privilege of riding home each 
day after school with a good-looking boyfriend. 

ITEM 11: We, Carolyn Butler and Estelle Regopolos, 
do will and bequeath to Mary Ann Hightower our 
ability to cut school during activities period and go 
to the "Varsity." 

ITEM 12: I, Betty McKnight, do will and bequeath 
to Eva Price my fifth and si.xth period study 
periods so that she may take a half-holida.v when- 
ever she can get away with it. 

ITEM 13: To Rita Calhoun and Mary Ann Co.sey, we, 
Lillian Harter and Mae Godowns, do will and be- 
queath the ability of talking without getting 
caught while .-tudying in the library. 

ITEM 14 : We, Florrie Fleming, Virginia Towill, Anne 
Carmichael, Sally Xi.xon, Cynthia Bolton, and Car- 
olyn Hadden, do will and bequeath our lunch- 
room table to anyone unprepared for the next 
class period and too lazy to stand in the line. 

ITEM 15: We, Harriette Perkins, Anne Parrish, and 
Mary Powell, do will and bequeath to any future 
chemistry student our ability to mix all kinds of 
compounds to look at the many pretty colors and 
come out alive. 



ITEM 16: We, Gloria Beddingfield and Mary Alice 
Blair, do will and bequeath to Mary Belger our 
ability to slip over to the Drug Store during ac- 
tivities period. 

ITEM 17 : I, Mary Young, do will and bequeath to any 
lucky Junior my ability to make all A's in short- 
hand. 

ITEM 18 : We, Barbara Mulcay and Grace Satcher, do 
will and bequeath to Mary Ramsay and Marilyn 
Chambers our membership in the "Little Sister's 
Club." 

ITEM 19 : I, Pat.sy Blanchard, do will and bequeath to 
Mary Alice Sumerau my ability to do shorthand. 

ITEM 20: I, Shirley Allgood, do will and bequeath to 
Ann Eubanks the last place in the lunch room line 
in hopes that she will be able to have more time to 
eat than I did. 

ITEM 21 : We. i\Iarlha Crenshaw and Peggy Durham, 
do will and bequeath to the oncoming Seniors, our 
ability to get out of Hi-story 42 without an excuse. 

ITEM 22: I, Jeannette Gay, do will and bequeath to 
Mary Mc Kinney my ability to look as if I'm con- 
centrating on the Treaty of 1783 in Miss Boat- 
wright's room while I'm dreaming of Bill Law- 
rence. 

ITEiM 23: I. Marian Foster, do will and bequeath to 
Bobbie Jean Abear, my ability to sneak in and out 
of Miss Hulbert's room without getting caught. 

ITEM 24: I, Joan Fulmer, do will and bequeath to 
Peggy Marriot my ability to go steady and pa.ss 
chemistry at the same time. 

ITEM 25: I, Mary Ann Cox, do will and bequeath to 
Ann Story my ability to cut up en the school bus 
and get put off for two weeks. 

ITEM 26 : I, Peggy Wilensky, do will and bequeath 
my song, "I'm a Senior Now," to the Juniors. May 
they only have to sing it one year. 

ITEM 27: We, Joe Ann Hendrix and Mar.jorie Jen- 
nings, do will and becjueath to any fortunate mor- 
tals who can do so, the ability to live through Tub- 
man and laugh. 

ITEM 28: I, Jeannette Crawford, do will and be- 
queath to my si.ster, Roberta, the ability to leave 
home when the la.st bell rings and get to school 
on time. 

ITEM 29: I, Barbara Gla.-.s, do will and bequeath to 
Mildred Ruben my ability to run the movie pro- 
jector without getting shocked. 

ITEM 30: We, Mary Ruth Bridges and Nelle Ruth 
Guill, do will and bequeath to Marcia .Ansted and 
Annette Banks our revised edition of Macbeth so 
that they may profit more by it than we have. 

ITEM 31 : We, Jean Bowick and Vivian Balkcum, do 
will and bequeath the typewriter in Room 304 to 
anyone who is unfortunate enough to take the re- 
sponsibility of decoding everyone's handwriting. 

ITEM 32: We, Gloria Johnson and Wanda Matthews, 
do will and bequeath to Martha Goodwin and 
Dorothy Matthews our ability to get into Mi.ss 
Strau.ss' history cla.is in time to hear her say "Take 
out pencils and paper." 



ITEM 33 : I, Barbara Johnson, do gladly will and be- 
queath to Ruth Maddox and Sue Simmons my 
seat in Miss von Kamp's room and the ability to 
argue with her. 

ITEM 34: I, Hazel Weatherford, do will and be- 
queath to Sue Martin my ability to make my speed 
on a broken-down typewriter. 

ITEM 35 : I, Connie Wilson, do will and bequeath to 
Ann Peters, my title of "Hop-a-long Stupidy" in 
the hope that it fits her as well as it fits me. 

ITEM 36 : We, Wanda Matthews and Sandra McCon- 
nell, do will and bequeath to Helen Girardot and 
Dot McElveen our new chemistry lab, due to the 
unfortunate circumstance that we one day mixed 
the wrong chemicals. 

ITEM 37 : I, Betty Meeks. do will and bequeath to the 
incoming chemistry class the pleasure of taking 
that marvellous subject under Miss Mary Meyer. 

ITEM 38: I, Carolyn Eubanks, do will and bequeath 
to Imogene Cox my ability to chew gum in Miss 
Halbert's music class, and not get away with it. 

ITEM 39 : We, Ada B., Betty B., Helen and Marian F., 
do will and bequeath our seats in Miss Boatwright's 
history class to Winton F., Bobbie A., Geraldine 
S., and Ola P. 

ITEM 40: We, Rehean Usry, Margaret Dye, Jackie 
Chavous, and Myrl Walker, do will and bequeath 
to Maria Wilson, Patsy Jones, and Dot Bailey our 
ability to skip school and get caught the first time 
we did it. 

ITEM 41: I, Annette Harper, do will and bequeath 
to Nell Wilson my ability to stick with things in 
spite of competition. 

ITEM 42: I, Alice Whitt, do hereby will and be- 
queath to Ann Bradstreet my ability to sit in typ- 
ing class and type a timed writing while humming 
the tune to all the latest popular recordings. 

ITEM 43 : I, Nancy Willingham, do will and bequeath 
to Gay Middleton my ability to slip from the Sop- 
homore class to the Senior Class (after remaining 
three years in the Sophomore Class) . 

ITEM 44: I, Mary Yarbrough, do will and bequeath 
all my cooking lessons to Glenda Smith. 

ITEM 45 : I. Sara Thigpen, do will and bequeath to 
Miriam Douglas my ability to take shorthand at 
150 words a minute. 

ITEM 46 : I, Barbara Bennett, do will and bequeath to 
my sister, Betty, my ability to get in and out of 
trouble with Mrs. Turner. 

ITEM 47: We, Jackie Shipman and Jane Huguley, 
do will and bequeath to Betty Beeson and Mar- 
garet Griff'is one large economy-sized bottle of glue 
so that they can stick together as much as we do. 

ITEM 48: I, Bengovan George, do will and bequeath 
to Kathleen Smith, my ability to get fussed at by 
teachers about spending more time on basketball 
than studies. 

ITEM 49 : I, Barbara Allen, do will and bequeath to 
Ruth Jump my desk by the radiator in chemis- 
try class, in hopes that she will profit by my ex- 
perience and learn sooner than I did to protect her 
elbows by wearing long sleeves. 

ITEM 50 : I, Carolyn Whitlock, do will and bequeath 
to Nancy Trimmier my ability to get a seat beside 
Elynor Fortune in Study Hall without Miss Anchors 
catching me. 

ITEM 51: We, Anne Livingston, Kay Neelands, and 
Cynthia Bolton, do will and bequeath to Lora Lee 
Lutes and Mary Ramsay our ability to remain on 
"The Black List" for months at a time in Spanish 
Class. 

ITEM 52: We, Miss McAuliffe's History Class of 
1949-50, do will and bequeath to the coming 42's 
our ability to accept Miss McAuliffe's sarcastic re- 
marks with a grin. 



ITEM 53 : I, Jean Graham, do hereby will my ability 
to freeze at all football games in my majorette 
uniform, to Peggy Thomson and "Shortie" Wil- 
liams in hopes that between the two of them they 
can remember their blankets. 

ITEM 54 : We, Pat Marbut, and Martha Dye, do will 
and bequeath to Janie Marbut and Anne Dye our 
ability to refrain from murdering each other after 
each sarcastic remark. 

ITEM 55 : I, Roslyn Bogoslov, do will and bequeath 
to the next editor of the Tubman Times my week- 
ly staff meetings in the hope that she, too, may 
thus escape from activities period in a home room. 

ITEM 56 : We, Mary Frances Herndon and Nancy 
Powell, do will and bequeath to Betty Rodgers 
and Glenice Goodwin our ability to make a book 
report in Miss Pearce's class without reading the 
book. 

ITEM 57 : I, Elsie Anne Willige, do will and bequeath 
to any unfortunate junior my great typing ability. 

ITEM 58 : We, Mary Luckey and Mary Powell, do will 
and bequeath our comfortable "rocky" chairs to 
eat lunch on the ground to anyone who wants it. 

ITEM 59 : We, Anne PaiTish and Grace Harris, do 
will and bequeath to Suzie Morris and Angie 
Drew all our beatup loafers and baggy sweaters 
in hopes that they will be as well-dressed ! 

ITEM 60 : We, Nancy Montgomery and Saul Sin Loo, 
do will and bequeath to Eva Price and Shirley 
Heath the ability to be the shortest girls of the 
Senior Class of next year. 

ITEM 61 : I, Jane Ragsdale, do will and bequeath to 
Connie Tabb my playful manner and scatter 
brains. 

ITEM 62 : I, Austin Gilliland, do will and bequeath to 
Marilyn Chambers my ability to get out of Tubman 
in four years. 

ITEM 63: I, Hilda Moore, do will and bequeath to 
Margie Holley my title of "Hilda Better-late-than- 
never Moore." 

ITEM 64 : We, the Senior Class of 1950, do will and 
bequeath to the Class of 1951 : 

1. Our ability to be caught for every misdemeanor 
and felony committed. 

2. Our wonderful P. A. system that interrupts 
teachers at just the right moment. 

3. Our beautiful lovely luxuriant rear lawn (be- 
fore it was plowed under) . 

4. Our abilitv to stroll in the yards during study 
hall (Ha! Ha!). 

5. The coveted privilege of attending a co-ed 
school. 

6. The blessing of having men teachers with whom 
the girls can do as they please. 

ITEM 65 : To the faculty of 1950, we leave : 

1. A bottle of atomic juice and a box of uranium 
pills so that they may have the energy to teach 
the male pupils and hook the male teachers. 
(Good luck, girls!). 

2. The fresh paint job, new color schemes, and 
beautiful sceneries on all the walls in hopes 
that they will stay that way. 

ITEM 66 : To Miss Dora Hains, we leave : 

1. Hundreds and hundreds of boys-she loves 'em- 
to brighten her study halls. 
Marked, licked, sworn at. and delivered (C.O.D.), May, 

nineteen hundred and fifty, A. D. Ave Atque Vale! 

(Hail and Farewell!) 

Senior Class of 1950 
Witnesses : 

Marjorie Jennings 

Jane Heng 

Hilda Moore 

Martha Dye 

Barbara Glass 
Notarized by Mary Balk 

(Notorious Public) 





ofiiiecu 



"Dat zc'at inakc I say -w'al I due, honey. In dis zvorril, lots cr fokcs 
is gottcr suffer fer udder fokes sins." 




Setting: Tuiimamac CKME'ncRV. AiiKUSla. Georgia, J050 A. D. 

Late one afternoon in jannan,-. J050 A. D.. two little girls were 
incessantly ciiatting as llicy skipped gaily along. Suddenly, greatly 
fascinated by the name Tiibniaiiiai Cenwtcry. which was skillfully 
carved in large letters on the arc above the opened ccmeter\- gate. 
one of the girls stopped, pointed toward the arc, and exclaimed, 
"Look, Sally Patica! Isn't that funny — Tubnianiae.^ Why is this 
cemetery called that?" 

Sally Patica calmly answered Mary Kuthie by relating this tale 
(notice how the Atomic Age has improved the diction of the young- 
er generation) : 

"My great-grandmother, the former Sally Nixon, has often told 
me about this cemetery, but I have never been inside it. She said that 
a long time ago (1^50 to be exact), her gnuluating class, the last 
Senior Class at Tubman High School, decided to buy a huge plot 
of land where all of them would be buried when they died. All of 
her schoolmates agreed to call that plot of land Tuhnuwiac Cemetery 
because outsiders thought that even, girl in that graduating class of 
1950 was a maniac to invest her money tn a burying ground in the 
prime of her life. To make their plan even more spectacular, tliey 
wanted to tell the world about their lives through the epitaphs on 
their tombstones." 

"Gee. Whillikins," commented Mar\- Ruthic. "Let's go in and see 
whether what your great grand-mother told yon is really true." 

Sally Patica nodded her consent and both girls reverently enter- 
ed the spacious, hut well-kept ccmeler\. The first object that at- 
tracted their attention was a shiny white tombstone with these words 
clearly inscribed on it : 

"Here lietli the last Senior Class of Tubman High, 
and 

Licth and lieth " 

After gazing at the many white tombstones appearing here and 
yonder, the girls then began taking turns reading the epitaphs aloud. 

Mary Ruthie started. "Hilda Moore— born njjt3 — died JO.v* of 
a strike-over. Kan a huge stenographic school. Was educated by 
typing the 1050 Annual with Mani Lynn." 

Then Sally Patica remarked. "Oon't bother about the dates. 
It's getting late." Moving to the next stone, she read. "Gloria John- 
son used to be such a talker until she swallowed her tongue one 
day tr\ing to hit high 'C'." 

"Betty Clark and Betty jean Fell were the greatest two-woman 
basket-ball team in history. Betty died of heart failure when Betty 
Jean eloped with Jack." 

"Barbara Allen, the famous scientist, won the N'ohcl Prize in 
Science for figuring out that complicated formula — H^O. 

"Barbara Glass became a dental hygienist and tortured all of 
her former Tubman teachers. Both uppers and lowers." 

"Johnnie Wombles swallowed some air in a giggling fit and 
strangled." 

"Jackie Shipman was a well-known celebrity. She's still cele- 
brating seven nights out of six like she did at those homegrown 
debuts on Hickman Road." 

"Sondra Williams starved to death in a garret in Paris while she 
was studyinu art. This is remarkable since she was discovered under 
a stack of lunch room potatoes au gralin." 

"Cynthia Bollon. who always bated to be tied down in one place, 
became a navy nurse and caught a fellow in ever\- port."' 

"Xelle Ruth Gnill married a famous football player and wrote 
many articles about him in her sports section of the -Vcte York 
Times, the successor of the Tuhmar, Times." 

"Joe Ann Hendrix shot herself when she made a remark that 
no one else thought was funny." 

"Sandra McConnell. a famous soloist and concert pianist, puzzled 
the critics who couldn't decide which of her talents to rate highest. 
Therefore they awarded Marjorie Jennings the music medal for her 
great book entiled 'Songs of the African Ciraffc-Mufe in 4 Sharps.' 
(The giraffe is the dumbest in the animal kingdom)" 

"Jane Heng always was malicious. She mixed up a mess in her 
pharmacy that made Miss Dora's hair tum chartreuse. Got twenty 
years in San Qiientin." 



"Sally Nixon married a handsome English bishop because they 
both had the desire to adopt an orphanage of Polish children. Un- 
fortunately they found no orphanages at either Pole — Nortli or 
South." 

"Austin Gilliland became honoran- commander-in-chief of the 
army and the n^vy on the navy outpost on the moon." 

Martha Dye was a great criminal lawyer (she always was 
crooked) and part-time history teacher at Tubman. She finally 
starved to deatli trying to make both ends meet, that is, both ends 
of her tonsils. She should have kept her trap shut!" 

"Ann Carmichae! and Aimc Parrisb. tlie great chemists who 
were working on the T (Tubman) Bomb, became so careless that 
thev heated some wronc answercide and blew their tops, (Off, that 
is).""^ 

"Tean Oliveros became a famous screen star plaving the part of 
The Pumh Peroxide Hlrnde:' 

"Jane Huguley and Sara ("lalloway w'orkcd as a team and were 
hailed as the world's most infamous ballerinas." 

"Sylvia Melton found her long-lost cousin, James Melton, and 
teamed up with him at the Metropolitan Opera House." 

"Florrie Fleming became a writer and illustrator of children's 
books, which were made famous by her husband's twelve children 
of former wives." 

'Tat Marbut. who discovered the theory of make-up applicition, 
received tiiirleen degrees from Harvard and caught an excruciating- 
ly handsome husband with an 1. Q. of 500. Made her feel like a 
moron." 

"\'irginia Towill so afraid of being an old maid, hitched up 
with the first handsome man she met after her graduation." 

"Saul Sin Loo and Harriet Jue. who always were in trouble at 
Tubman, had an act in burlesque as the Photo Twins. Got arrested 
for double exposure." 

"koslyn Bogeslov gave up her journalistic career in order 
to spend her life driving around the world in her husband's Cadillac 
along with her five boys and one girl (the girl, to i)rcak the mo- 
notony). 

"Jean I'.lliott was an emhahner, but here lies one bod> that she 
couldn't embalm." 

"Peggy Wilensky was a well-known composer of classical music 
such as 'I'm A Senior \*c w.' 'I'm Really Out.' and 'Goodnight. You 
Fright.' (referring to Tubman)." 

"Jewell Bentley. a very .ictive charity worker even gave her 
life to Freddie for cliarily." 

"Betty and Mar\ Luckey were awarded the sports trophy for ten 
years in succession. There never were any women in their audiences, 
though; there wasn't room after the men all got in." 

"CaroKn Madden, famous 'hamburgisl' and 'hot-doger' at the 
Carolyn Keiuiedy Circus, sold some of her specialties to (iracc 
Harris, who died of 'two-man' poison." 

"Kay Xeelands. an outstanding bacteriologist, discovered a cure 
for that dreaded disease, 'examinationitus'." 

"Lillian Harler aiul .\Iae Godowns astonished the public by their 
stupendous performances as chorus girls." 

"Nancy Willingham. the greatest comedienne on Broadway, died 
of indigestion while eating the pie tliat Jane Ragsdale threw her 
from the top balcony." 

"Klsie Ann Willige, having learned sewing and chemistry at the 
same time in high school, finally got her formula mixed with her 
pattern and sewed Iierself into a beaker." 

"Peggy Durham, at first just a salesgirl, worked her way up 
until she owned all ihe stores in the South. Her success was due 
to her man-lrapping courses that she gave in secret." 

"Ann Harper won the Pulitzer Prize for the perfect novel about 
that perfect place. South Carolina." 

"Lois Dozier. a night chdi singer, was the special attraction at 
the Brown Derby that drew hordes of horses there each night." 

'Carolyn Butler, another Florence Nightingale, was very pro- 
voked when a patient of hers-Sam Goldwyn — offered her a seven 
\ear movie contract. She was too devoted to her work." 

Nelle Winn Blanchard, beloved French teacher at Tubman, re- 
signed to marry that handsome Frenchman whom she met abroad. 
Bon \'oyage. Iloui soil qui mal y pense. 

(.Shamed be he who thinks evil of it)." 

"Hazel Prescott. secretary for a wealthy man. enjoye<l taking 
dictation while sitting on her employer's wallet." 

"Bengovan George and Betty Jo Home participated in the 
OI\-mpian games the year before they took up iihysical education 
teaching at Tubman. Olympics are required of all Pbys. K<1. teachers 
now." 

"Beverly McMichacI, the first woman firechief in Augusta, 
got run over by her little red wagon while rushing to put out an 
old wreck. (You guess which one)." 

Harriette Perkins, wb.ose brief styles set all the World in a dither, 
threw herself so hard into a new style that the breeze swept her off 
her feet and she is, as the saying goes, "Gone With The Wind." 

"Golly I It's getting really dark I" excitedly .announced Sally 
Patica. "We had better be getting home, or MolJier will be worried 
about us." 

"Oh. I do wish we didn't have to go yet. There are so many 
more tombstones to be read. Sally Patica, can't we stay just a little 
longer?" besought Man. Ruthie. 

Before Sally Patica could reply, a bird hovering in the tree 
under which tlie girls stood, issued forth such an eerie sound that 
both Sally Patica and Mary Ruthie, thoroughly frightened, dashed 
out of the ccmetcn. as fast as their legs could carry them. Without 
daring to stop, they raced through the gathering Iwiliyhi until they 
had arrived safe at home. 




Brer Rabbit Sez, Sezee: 

Stick to our Advertisers like the Tar Baby stuck to me! 



THOSE SMART TUBMAN GIRLS KNOW.. 

Cute Clothes 

COME FROM THE NEW 



JUL. 



U-^ 



TEEN-AGERS, as well as their Mothers Can 
have that coveted "CULLUM LOOK" 

EXCLUSIVE BUT NOT EXPENSIVE 



The South's Prettiest Girls \ 

Eat the South's Finest Bread i 

I 
I 




CbMSSenSS^^^^'^^ 



"The South's Finest Since 1841" 



COMPUMENTS 



Bowen Bros. 

I 905 Broad Street Dial 2-8855 | 

1849— 

"A HUNDRED YEARS IN AUGUSTA" 

—1949 — 



Compliments of 

Boardman Oil Company 

TEXACO PRODUCTS 



.-——■»■— — 


Lily. 


Compliments of 

-Tulip Cup Corporation 

Manufacturers of 
PAPER DRINKING CUPS and 










FOOD CONTAINERS 




— — ' 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Starr Smith Motors, Inc. 

DODGE PASSENGER CARS 

DODGE JOB-RATED TRUCKS 

PLYMOUTH PASSENGER CARS 

SALES — — — SERVICE 
521 Broad Street Augusta, Ga. 



I 



MOSS & WALL'S MARKET 

FRESH MEATS, SEA POODS 

FRESH DRESSED POULTRY 

Phone 3-4436 2571 Central Ave. 



COMPLIMENTS 
of the 

SOUTHERN LUBRICATING CO. 

CITIES SERVICE PRODUCTS 



COMPLIMENTS 

BETT'S GROCERY 

1835 WALTON WAY 

COMPLIMENTS 
of 

WOODBINE GROCERY 

WASHINGTON ROAD 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

S. H. KRESS & CO. 

5 - in - 25 
SCHOLASTIC SCHOOL SUPPLIES 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

FRUITLAND NURSERIES 



TAYLOR UPHOLSTERY SHOP 

1940 Broad Street 

SEAT COVERS and 

CONVERTIBLE TOPS 



COMPLIMENTS 

DAVISON'S AUTO SERVICE 



BARTON HOUSE WRECKING CO. 

ALL KINDS OF BUILDING MATERIAL 

LOCAL TRUCKING and STORAGE 

We Will Store or Buy Anything You Have 

1229 D'Antignae St. Dial 2-7297 

Augusta, Georgia 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

LUCERNE JERSEY FARM 



IF IT ROLLS ON 
WHEELS TAKE IT TO 

KEEL'S 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

MOTLOW LUMBER CO. 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

TABB FINANCE CO. 



FIFTH AVENUE SHOPPE 

"THE SHOPPE ALL WOMEN KNOW 



COMPLIMENTS 

of 

The Wright Pest Control Co. 

SO.-i ELLIS ST. AUGl'STA. G.-X. 

KNIGHT'S PHARMACY 

1203 TROUPE STREET 
PHONE 3-44S8 AUGUSTA. GA. 



DURING YOUR HOURS OF LEISURE 



I 

j VISIT THE 

\ 

I Miller Imperial 

I 

I Modjeska Rialto 

Theatres 



I Operated by 

i 

j AUGUSTA AMUSEMENTS, Inc. 



GREEN'S GARAGE 

COMPLETE AUTO REPAIR 

125 Fifth Street 
Phone 2-6455 



Compliments 

of the 

DOCTORS 




BOTTLING COMPANY OF AUGUSTA 

710 - 12th STREET 
TELEPHONE 2-4252 




Cruises 
Tours 




SOUTHERN TRAVEL 
AGENCY 

MORRISS ELLIS, Mgr. 
755 Broad St. 

Dial 2-7641 

Authorized Agents for Domestic 
and International Airlines 

TRANSATLANTIC AND CRUISE 

STEAMSHIP LINES 

HOTELS RAILWAYS 

CHARTER BUS SERVICE 

All Travel Arrangements At No 

Additional Cost to You 



J 

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) I 



TUBMAN HIGH 

Class Rings 

For Any Graduating Year 

Write 
H. S. CANFIELD 

1560 N. DECATUR ROAD 
ATLANTA, GEORGIA 

Manufactured by 

Herff-Jones Co. 



^fieene V <zjnc. 



Home of the "THING" 



SOUTH'S FINEST DRIVE-IN RESTAURANT 



Greene at East Boundary 



COMPLIMENTS 



Belk's Department Store 



Augusta, Georgia 






Busy Bee Restaurant 

FAMOUS FOR WESTERN STEAKS 
658 Broad St. Augusta, Ga. 



Iti 







<^c0/fs Qfladei 



NATIVE and WESTERN MEATS— POULTRY and SEA FOODS 



FRESH FRUITS and VEGETABLES 



FROZEN FOODS 



Phones 2-6496-7 



314 - 8th Street 



Stothart's Drug Store 

PARTRIDGE INN— AUGUSTA, GA. 
DIAL 3-5832 

Specialists in Prescriptions 
DRUGS and SODA 



The Light in Her Eyes 
Comes From the 

Pleasure in Her Ears — 
She Listens to — 



^JB¥- 



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COMPLIMENTS 
of 

Municipal Golf Course 

COMPLETE LINE OF ALL 

GOLF EQUIPMENT 
AND LESSONS 

PRO ■•RED" DOUGLAS 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 

Carey F. Weathers 

TRANSFER and STORAGE 

1268 DRUID PARK AVENUE 
AUGUSTA, GA. 



FOR A MILK-SHAKE AFTER THE GAME, 

FOR A GOOD WHOLESOME GLASS OF 

MILK AT HOME— 

"THE MILK BAR" 

AUGUSTA DAIRIES, Inc. 



I 



COMPLIMENTS 



OF 



117-119 Eighth Street 
Phone 2-7892 
Augusta, Ga. 



SAY IT WITH 
FLOWERS 

John Jackson's 
Florist 

1736 FENWICK STREET 

Augusta. Ocorgla 

TELEPHONE 4-4361 



58 



ON THE DIAL 



Compliments of 



WGAC 



ABC 

NETWORK 






Compliments of 

Dyke's Coal Company 

515 Fen wick Street 
Phone 2-5727 



Compliments 



of 



Hardy's Cleaners 



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Compliments of 

W. F. Burton 

421 Crawford Ave. 
Phone 3-4429 



Six Cox 

REFRIGERATION and 

AIR CONDITIONING 

1565 Broad Street 

Phone 2-3556 

9:00 A. M. — 6:00 P. M. 



CHRYSLER — PLYMOUTH 

Greene at 10th St. 

Phone 4-5551 



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Kilduff's Variety Stores 

"THE LITTLE STORES WITH 
THE BIG VALUES" 

2105 Kings Way 

1529 Walton Way 

Augusta, Ga. 



i I 

i . i ^ 

I Richmond Motor Co. I j 

i I 

j I 

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Compliments 
of 



j Southeastern Fur Co. 



911 Greene Street 



--* 



Compliments of 

Smoak's Bakery 

BUY WITH CONFIDENCE 
AND SERVE WITH PRIDE 



f~ 



Bentley Brothers 
Furniture Co. 

The Store of Friendly 

Service 

Broad at Eleventh Street 



».— .> 



Robert Wilkinson 

PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Studio 871 Broad St. 
Augusta, Ga. 

Commercial — Weddings — 
Portraits News 



McDonald & 
Weothersbee 
Motors, Inc. 

Ill - 5th Street 
Augusta, Ga. 



John F. Brickie & Co. 

BICYCLES — LAWN MOWERS 
REPAIRS 

CASH KECISTEUS and 
MARKET EQUIPMENT 

Phone 2-6732 846-50 Ellis St. 

JAMIE McELMURRAY, Mgr. 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



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Compliments of 

Ware Buick Co. 

Augusta, Ga. 



Hagler Tire and 
Supply, Ltd. 

GENERAL TIRES AND 

TEXACO PRODUCTS 

740 Reynolds St. 



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Woodward Superette 

PHONE 2-5064 

13th and Walton Way 

WE DELIVER 



T. L. BYRD 



M. B. BYRD 



B & B Lumber & 
Supply Co. 

Lumber and Building Materials I 

Yard and Office 

1245 D'Antignac St., Cor. 13th 

Phone 2-2359 Augusta, Ga. 



Merry Brothers 
Brick & Tile Co, 

MASONIC BUILDING AUGUSTA, GA. 

MANUFACTURERS 

FACE BRICK 

COMMON BRICK 

JUMBO BRICK 

STRUCTURAL TILE 
The Souf-h'S Largest Producers 



Established 1899 



All Your Clothes 
Should Go To 

siiio>y*as 



Compliments 
of 

SKYVIEW 

DRIVE-IN THEATRE 

•THE SOUTH'S FINEST" 

Olive Road 

Phone 6-1932 






5000 WATTS 
DAY and NIGHT 

CBS PROGRAMS 

AUGUSTA'S STATION 
OF THE STARS 



^^^ 




from SPM to THS . 

Small Profit Margin 
means we take less 
on the goods we sell 
and they're the best! 



Because of this 
you always get more 
at Augusta's leading 
COMPLETE dei)arlnient 
store ! 



J. B. White's 







WHEN YOU THINK OF 
A TREAT— REMEMBER 



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Krispy Cream Do-Nuts j I 



1S25l,-'2 WALTON WAY 

So Nice tor Your Picnics and 
Parties Too, and So Easy to 
Serve — Remember. Call 2-5978. 
TRY THEM FOR YOURSELF 



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Compliments 
of 

King Mill 



MEET ME AT 

EDMUNDS DRUG CO. 

502 Broad Street 



and 



EDMUNDS AND JONES 

1137 Greene Street 



Compliments 



of 



F. E. Ferris Cr Co. 



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THERE IS NO SUBSTITUTE 
FOR QUALITY 



129 • Sth Street 
DIAL 2-7545 



Daniers Shoe Repair | 
Shop I 



Gibbs Auto Wrecking 
Company 



East Boundary 
Phone 2-r,84S 



Sfluiltz Hill 
Phone .5-11477 



HIGHEST CASH PRICES PAID FOR 

WRECKED, BURNED OR USED 

CARS. PARTS FOR ALL 

MAKES OF CARS 



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The Garrett Commercial School | 

FOR INFORMATION CALL jj 

MRS. R. L. GARRETT [ 

TFLEPHON'E :!-ISIi; j 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

DAVISON'S DRIVE-IN 

OPEN 10 A. M.— 2 A. M. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

AUGUSTA BUILDING SUPPLY CO. 

1559 Broad Street 

TWIN CLEANERS 

702 Crawford Avenue 
Augusta. Ga. 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

WYLIE'S 5 and 10 
ODOM SIGN SERVICE 

863 Reynolds Street 
Augusta. Oa. 

RALEY & COMPANY 

FURNITrUE iind PHII.CO APPLIA.N'CES 

MITCHELL, GEORGIA 

Phone No. 6 

BOARDMAN MOTORS 

STlllKllAKKIi C.Mi.s. TKPCKS 

EXPERT BODY REPAIR and 
SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

COMl'LI.MK.NTS OV 

COLLEGE PHARMACY 



INVISIISLE HALF SOLES 

FOX SHOE REPAIR 

ALL WORK GUARANTEED 

215 - 7th Street 

.Aupusta. Ga. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



CARTER ELECTRIC CO. 



FAIR - JOPLING - ANDREWS 
APPLIANCE CO. 

303 - 9th Street 519 ■ 13th Street 

Phone 2-985'1 — 2-6997 



COLONIAL 
is good 
BREAD 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

LAUNDROMAT 

423 Crawford Avenue 
PHONE 3-2201 



COMPLIMENTS OF 
LOMBARD BRINSON 

MEN'S WKAR 



CO.MPLIMENTS OF 

H. SHMERLING 

JEWELER 



COMI'I.IMKN'TS OF 

CHECKERBOARD FEED STORE 

Phcne 2-5254 1151 Broad St. 

Augusta, Ga. 



CO.MPl.l.MKNTS OF 



UNITY SUPER MARKET 



Georgia and South Carolina 

Municipal, Local and General 

Market Securities 

Johnson, Lane, Space 
& Company, Inc. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

733 Broad St. Phone 2-7741 

Augusta, Georgia 



CONGRATULATIONS 

to the 

CLASS OF '50 

THE STORE FOR EVERYBODY 



Wm. Schweigert Co. 



JEWELERS FOR 



THREE GENERATIONS 



C. F. Wilkinson, Sr. Etliel K. AVilkinson 
SINCE 1920 

WILKINSON'S 

WASHINGTON ROAD 
Richmond Ccunty's Oldest Country Store 



MILLER - ADAMS, Inc. 

OFFICE SUPPLIES & EQUIPMENT 

A. & M. BLUE PRINT CO. 

805 Reynolds Street 

Compliments of 
WELT STORES, Inc. 

1756 Broad St. Augusta, Ga. 

Ciimpiiments of 

SILVER'S 

6 AND 10c STORE 
004 Broad Street 



AUGUSTA BOOK STORE 

833 BROAD STREET 
COMPLIMENTS OF 

HOME FOLKS CIGAR STORE 

754 Broad St. Phone 2-7379 

NEWSTAXn. LUNCHES. CIGARS 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

SIMKINS SEED CO. 



BECKUM & JONES 

JEWELEHS 

Phone 2-6707 857 Broad St. 

.\ugusta, da. 

SERVICE GARAGE 

Specialists 

FORD - MERCURY - LINCOLN REPAIRS 

A. S. Ledhctler. IS Years With Ford 

Clias. Yapielln 
8^5-47-49 Reynolds St. Phone 2-1480 

SOUTHERN DIESEL CO.. Inc. 

North Augusta. S. C. 

DEALER FOR G. M. DIESEL 

MOTORS and KELVINATOR 
PRODUCTS 



Harrison Transfer & Storage Co. 

Agent for North American Van Lines 

Nationwide 

PACKING— SHIPPING— STORAGE 

825 Calhcun St. Phone 2-2396 

.\ugusta. Ga. 

i:nc!ravin(; 
in vitatio.ns— cards 
social stationery 

RHODES OFFICE SUPPLY CO. 



304 - 8th Street 



Augusta, Ga. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

OXNER'S RADIO SERVICE 

1857 Central Avenue 
COMPLIMENTS OF 

W. T. GRANT CO. 

KNOWN FOR VALUES 
COMPLIMENTS OF 

FERRIS AUTO SUPPLY 



Hwy. 25 — 6 Miles North Phone 5-0071 

"WELCII.MI'; TO HKdWSE" 

ELLIS' ANTIQUES 

Quality Antli|ue.i nt Reasonable Prices 



SMITH BROTHERS 

HOTEL ami RESTAURANT EinH'MENT 

1027 Bro?d St. Phone 2-4243 

.\iisusla. Ga. 

BAILIE'S PARKING LOT 

■IN THE HEART OF THE 

nusi.vEss nisTHicT" 

736 Reynolds Street 
A, C. "BOOTS" BAILIE 

REBA MURPHY 

iiKESSES — COATS 

SUITS — MILLINERY 

City Hall Square 

916 Greene St. Augusta, Ga. 

W. C. IVEY COAL CO. 

COAL and FL'EL OIL 

DIAL 2-8218 

Roberts Street and Railroad Ave. 



/' El ^ 

SanckenV 

. MILK . 



..^o- 



cJ\<S 



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SanckenV 
ICECREAM 



f) HERMAN 
pHSTREEt 

Realtors 



VARSITY DRIVE-IN 

'■WHERE FRIENDS MEET" 

Gwinnett and Druid Park Avenue 

Telephone 4-3945 

W. E. MORRIS 
FIRE EQUIPMENT CO. 

314 Monument Street 
Telephone 2-2630 



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Compliments of 

Kings Way 
Pharmacy 

2113 KINGS WAY 

Augusta, Georgia 

TELEPHONE 3-4456 



Richmond Lumber Co. 

WHOLESALE LUMBER 

520 S. F. C. BIdg. Phcne 2-9026 

P. O. Box 337 Augusta, Ga. 

CALL US ON ANYTHING 
IN LUMBER 



WHEN YOU GOTTA 

GO 

CALL JOE 

Joe's Taxi 

DIAL 2-7711 

WHITE ONTA' 

VIOLETTE HEATH'S FLOWER 

AND GIFT SHOP 

Corner (ireeiie ;;ml Tubinun Streets 
PHONE 3-2244 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

LAKEMONT SERVICE STATION 

AllllSTA. CKuUdlA 
Telephone 3-7836 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

FOX CANDY COMPANY 

1442 GWINNETT ST. 

Georgia Sporting Goods, Inc. 

EQUIPMENT FOR ALL SPORTS 

319.21 - 7th St. Phone 2-1961 



DORIS JEWELERS 



"THE HOUSE OF STERLING" 



CO.MI'I.IME.NTS OF 

BELMONT 

"EVERYBODY KNOWS THE BELMONT 
SERVKS GOOD FOOD" 

Specializing in 
SEA FOODS and WESTERN STEAKS 

716 Broad St. Open Day and Night 



COMPLIMENTS 
of 



PACKARD 



E. J. ERBELDING & CO. 

G01-U:t llr ail Slri'Ct 
PLUMBING 



J. H. Mosley Plumbing & Heating 

Call Us When You Need IMuniliinc 

Free Estimates — Repair Work A Specialty 

1927 Savimnali Road. Phone 2-2288 

.\llt.Mlst;i. flcnrttzia 

COMPLIMENTS OF 

STEED OIL COMPANY 

R. A. STEKI) and A. M. TUU.MEY 
1002 Twiggs St. Augusta. Ga. 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



MURRAY'S FLORIST 



TOLEDO SCALES 

No Springs — llonfsl WeiKht 

SCALES AND FOOD MACHINES 

S.'iles ,'ind Service 

A. C. MiKIN.XO.V. .Mcr. 

1559 Walton Way Augusta, Ga. 

Telephone 2-1580 






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[ T. M. Nickles j 

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I BLYTHE, GEORGIA | 

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Southern Motors, Inc. ; 

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I 119 - 9th Street | 

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LINCOLN — MERCURY SALES — SERVICES 



COMPLIMENTS OF 

Murray Brothers, Inc. 

I Distributors for 

j BORDEN'S FINE CHEESES 

[ BEST FOODS PRODUCTS 

AVOSET 

PHONE 2-9806 



Jernigan Hardware 
Company 

WHOLESALE and RETAIL 

1033-1039 Broad Street 

Augusta, Georgia 



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iMlar for Dollar- 
wu cant Wat a 

See The New Modern Home of 

PONTIAC MASTER 

AUTO SERVICE 

11th at Telfair St. 



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Augusta Typewriter 
Exchange 

DISTRIBUTORS FOR ROYAL 

Royal Typewriters 

Royal Portables 

Victor Adding Machines 

Friden Calculators 



Satcher Company 

BUILDER SUPPLIES 

R. O. W. WINDOW UNITS 

Tenth and Fenwick Streets 

Phone: 2-5636 — 2-7669 



Henry Darling, Inc. 

CHEVROLET 

Sales — Service 

Augusta, Ga. 



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Frank Goldberg Co. 

Featuring Exclusively Junior 
By CARLYE 

MARION McCOY 

DORIS DODSON 

MINX MODES 



W. W. Bush 

GENERAL INSURANCE 
423 Masonic Bldg. 
Telephone 2-9035 



Augusta Sporting 
Goods Company j 

"EQUIPMENT FOR I 

EVERY SPORT" 1 

210-212 Eighth Street 

Phone 2-6007 



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Compliments of 

Audio-Visual Center 

216 - 12th St. Phone 2-0591 

"EVERYTHING FOR THE 
AUDIO-VISUAL PROGRAM" 



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Compliments 

H. A. Edwards 

Distributor 

GULF PRODUCTS 

Augusta, Georgia 

Phone 2-4831 — 2 

1 Nicholas Street 



Compliments of 

Howard Lumber Co. 

p. 0. Box 201 

1900 Milledgeville Road 

Augusta, Ga. 



"Dispensing EJxclusively for tlie 
Eye Pliysician" 

MURPHY & ROBINSON 

PRESCRIPTION OPTICIANS 

Member Opticians Guild 

Lobby S. F C. BIdg. Dial 2-5641 1 

BASSFORD MOTOR CO., Ltd. 

CUSHMAN MOTOR SCOOTERS 
1126 Ellis Street 



ROCKET AHEAD WITH OLDSMOBILE 

Dependable Since 1931 

Eastern Motor Company 

YOUR FUTURAMIC OLDSMOBILE DEALER 
Broad Street Phone 2-2655 







Dansby Brothers & Company 

PLUMBING and HEATING 
1202 D'Antignac Street 
AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



COMPLIMENTS 

Superior Laundry 

PHONE 2-5511 
LAUNDERERS and CLEANERS 



j DE SOTO — PLYMOUTH 

I Authorized 

I SALES — SERVICES I 

( Garrison - Roberts Motors, Inc. 

I 

I 111 Eighth Street Phone 4-1424 

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COMPLIMENTS OF 

Bowe Contracting Co., Inc. 

SUCCESSORS TO 

Wm. F. Bowe Cr Company 

MUNICIPAL WORK— SIDEWALKS— DRIVEWAYS 

READnriX CONCRETE 

Office 540 Reynolds Street Phone 2-2211 

Redimix Plant, 1310 Walker Street Phone 2-0597 

Asphalt Plant, Ada Ramp Walden Road Phone 3-8841 



A. J. Kilpatrick, Jr. 

INVESTMENT SECURITIES 

TELEPHONE 2-4028 

138 - 8th Street 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



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SUMERAU'S 

"OPEN 24 HOURS A DAY" 

1800 Broad St. Phone 3-4495 

Augusta, Ga. 



I Lake View Pharmacy j 



Compliments 
of 



Margaret Lotz Shop 



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1533 Walton Way Phone 2-7766 

QUALITY GROCERIES— DRESSED 

POULTRY SEAFOOD 

CHOICE MEATS— FRESH PRODUCE 

FROZEN FOOD 

Free Delivery to AM Parts of Augusta 

and Suburbs 

FOR BEST IN FOODS . . . 

PHONE DREWS . . . 2.T766 



W. E. Raines Co. 

Inc. 

BUILDING SPECIALTIES 

and SUPPLIES 

METAL PRODUCTS 

14 Seventh Street 

Augusta. Ga. 



Gilbert Furniture Co. 

1007 Broad St. Phone 2-2021 
Augusta, Georgia 



Phoenix Oil Co. 

FUEL OII^— MOTOR OIL 
SANITARY SUPPLIES 

Your Patronage Is Solicited 
and Appreciated 

5th at Watkins St. Phone 2-5321 

AUGUSTA. GEORGIA 



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Compliments of 



Sidney Smith Paper j 



Company 

562 Reynolds St. 
Phone 2-6360 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 

Augusta Veneer Company 

i AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 

{ 

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t Walker - Durant Motor Co. 

YOUR FORD DEALER 
I Broad at 14th Street Phone 2-5371 

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j HOME INDUSTRY 

( 

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ALLBURN COAL AIC COKE 

Patronize 

Augusta Ice & Coal Company 



COLD ALONE IS NOT ENOUGH 



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I Drink Royal Crown Cola 



BEST BY TASTE TEST 



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COMPLIMENTS OF j 

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j Murphey - Weatherford Plumbing & Heating | 

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j 712 - 12th Street Tel. 2-8556 | 

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Warren Walker, Jeweler | 

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HOUSE OF FINE STERLING j 

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Sterling Silver Crystals Gifts China j 



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COMPLIMENTS OF | 

Augusta Garage j 

742 Reynolds Street j 

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2-6885 I 

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[ 

BEST WISHES | 

Georgia-Carolina Brick & Tile Co. 

AUGUSTA, GEORGIA 



«-..H 



CONGRATULATIONS 
FROM 




llf AuguBto (SlirDnUlr ~«=5S=^ THE AUGUSTA HERALD 

Telephone 4-54S3 



Georgia - Pacific Plywood & 
Lumber Company 

SOUTHERN FINANCE BUILDING 






BICYCLES AND MOTORCYCLES 

ALL MAKES OF BICYCLES REPAIRED 

R. L. Sumerau & Son 



MAXWELL BROTHERS 

FURNITURE 

RADIOS, FRIGIDAIKES, DRAPERIES 

Phone 2-5526 

933 Broad Street Augusta, Georgia 



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"CABINETS FOR THE HOME" j j 

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Compliments of 

Norvell Cabinet Co. 

p. O. Box 382 Augusta, Ga. 

PHONE 2-2512 



Bodeker ° Fuller 
Drug Company 

Broad and 12th Street 
PHONE 2-5577 

Augusta, Ga. 



H. & S. Cleaners I 



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THE CLEANEST CLEANERS 

1282 Broad Street 

ONE DAY SERVICE 

Phone 2-8643 

— OWNER — 
STANLEY ERICKSON 



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Compliments of 

Brigham's 

1732 Broad Street 
Augusta, Ga. 




Murphy Stationery 
Company 

SOCIAL and COMMERICAL 
STATIONERY 

718 Broad Street 

Dial 2-2122 



CENTRAL AMOCO SERVICE STATION 

AMOCO PRODUCTS 

Washing — Polishing — Lubrication 

Battery Recharging 

ROAD SERVICE 

G. R. LANDRUM. Prep. 

2598 Central Ave. Phone 3-9192 

MONTE SANO SERVICE STATION 

TEXACO PRODUCTS 

Washing — Polishing — Lubrication 

Battery Recharging 

EUGENE SriMMERALL. Prop. 

1521 Monte Sano Ave. Phone 3-6912 



Compliments of 

Ruben's 

AUGUSTA'S ONLY 

HOME-OWNED 

DEPARTMENT STORE 

2-6671 2-6672 



HEY KIDS!! LET'S BOWL A GAME AT 
Augusta's Largest Recreation Place 

I Richmond Bowling Academy 

OA'ER THE BUSY BEE 
Open 7 Days a Week Until ? O'Clock 

— REDUCED RATE TO SCHOOL LEAGUES - 



^.^* 



Bailie Furniture Company 

726 Ellis Street 

SHADES — AWNINGS — UNOLEUM 

PICTURES — FRAMING 

Phone 2-2951 



AUGUSTA'S OUTSTANDING 

LAUNDERERS and CLEANERS 

FOR OVER 50 YEARS 

Hulse Laundry, Inc. 

■MUST A GOOD ONE" 

1976 Ellis Street 320 - 8th Street 

3-4451 Phone 2-2460 



YOU'LL BE AT THE HEAD OF THE CLASS WITH 
'HEARTS DESIRE" CERTIFIED GENUINE DIAMONDS 

SOLD ON CON\ENIEXT CREDIT TERMS 

Friedman's Jewelers 

816 Broad Street Augusta, Ga. 




Metcalf at Walton Way 




f^yne ^mck and ^oid 

Now we'll give a cheer for Tubman, 
For the school we love the most! 
Evermore we sing her praises. 
And her name shall be our boast. 
To the top we'll raise her colors. 
And her standards ever hold. 
Then let us give a rousing cheer 
For the TubmaTi Black and Gold, 
Then let us give a rousing cheer 
For the Tubman Black and Gold. 

CHORUS 

So . . . with voices loud and strong. 

To her name we'll raise a song 

For to her our hearts belong, 

With a love untold 

Then we'll cheer for Tubman High! 

May her .spirit never die ; 

Victorious may fly 

Dear old Black and Gold. 

—VcUna Bell '25 



fiMuioa^a^iAi^ 



ACKNOWLEDGMENTS 

The drawings from Walt Disney's "Songs Of The South" are 
copyright by Walt Disney Productions and reprinted here through their 
kind permission. 
Photographers: Portraits — Robert Wilkinson Studio 

Action Shots — Morgan Fitz, Photographer 
Faculty cuts of Miss Jones and Miss Hart — 

Breault's Studio 
Engravers: The Garden City Engraving Company 
Printers: Walton Printing Company 
Quotations: 

Joel Chandler Harris, Uncle Remus, His Songs and His Sayings 




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